Telamon

Telamon

Telamon

Telamon or Telemon was the son of King Aeacus of Aegina and Queen Endeis in Greek mythology. He followed Jason in the Argonautic Expedition to retrieve the Golden Fleece, and he also participated in the hunt for the Calydonian Boar. His brother was Peleus, and the two of them were close friends of the demigod hero Heracles.

Telamon and Peleus had a half-brother, Phocus, and their mother told them to kill him. After doing the deed and they were discovered, Aeacus banished them from the island of Aegina. Telamon went to Salamis and found refuge at the court of King Cychreus; he married the king's daughter, Periboea, and had a son with her, Ajax.

Telamon also appeared in the myth of Heracles sacking the city of Troy. Poseidon had sent a sea monster to destroy the city. There are two versions of the myth; in one, the king of Troy, Tros, asked Heracles to kill the monster. Heracles, in return, asked for the horses that Tros had received from Zeus, after the kidnapping of Ganymede. Tros agreed, and Heracles assisted by Telamon successfully killed the monster. Telamon then married Hesione, the daughter of Tros, with whom he had a son, Teucer. The other version has it that the king of Troy was Laomedon, who planned on sacrificing his daughter Hesione to Poseidon. Heracles saved her, killed the monster, as well as Laomedon and his sons, with the exception of Ganymede, who had already been abducted by Zeus, and Podarces, who was helping Heracles. Telamon then married Hesione and had Teucer together.

See Also: Aeacus, Endeis, Jason, Argonauts, Golden Fleece, Calydonian Boar, Peleus, Heracles, Phocus, Poseidon, Zeus, Ganymede, Laomedon

Telamon Q&A

Who was Telamon?

Telamon or Telemon was the son of King Aeacus of Aegina and Queen Endeis in Greek mythology. He followed Jason in the Argonautic Expedition to retrieve the Golden Fleece, and he also participated in the hunt for the Calydonian Boar.

Who were the parents of Telamon?

The parents of Telamon were Telamon and Endeis.

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