Pelopia

Pelopia

Pelopia

Pelopia was the daughter of Thyestes in Greek mythology. Thyestes was a contender of the Mycenaean throne, along with his brother Atreus. Because of this rivalry, but also because he had an affair with Atreus' wife, Thyestes' sons were killed by Atreus. Thyestes sought advice from an oracle, who said that if he fathered a son with his daughter Pelopia, then that son would avenge his brothers' deaths. So, when Pelopia went to the river to wash her clothes, her father, wearing a mask, attacked and raped her. Pelopia was impregnated and gave birth to Aegisthus, whom she abandoned as he reminded her of her father's offence. Aegisthus was raised by a goat and was later found by a shepherd. The shepherd brought Aegisthus to Atreus' court, who raised him as his own son. Some time later, Thyestes was captured and Atreus asked Aegisthus to kill him. However, Thyestes recognised his son by the sword he was carrying, and they both plotted against Atreus; the plan was executed and Atreus was killed. However, when Thyestes introduced Pelopia to Aegisthus, she recognised the sword as the one her rapist was carrying, and realised that it was her father who raped her. As a result, she killed herself with that sword.

See Also: Thyestes, Atreus, Aegisthus

Pelopia Q&A

Who was Pelopia?

Pelopia was the daughter of Thyestes in Greek mythology. Thyestes was a contender of the Mycenaean throne, along with his brother Atreus.

Who were the parents of Pelopia?

The parent of Pelopia was Thyestes.

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