Pandrosus

Pandrosus

Pandrosus was the daughter of the first king of Athens, Cecrops, in Greek mythology, and the sister of Aglaurus and Herse.

The three sisters played a role in the myth of Erechtheus, the king that succeeded Cecrops on the Athenian throne. According to the myth, the goddess Athena visited the workshop of the blacksmith god Hephaestus in order to ask him for weapons. Hephaestus made advances towards Athena and tried to rape her. The goddess successfully evaded him, but not before his semen fell on her thigh. Athena, disgusted, took a piece of cotton and wiped the semen off, and then threw the cotton on the ground. Where it fell, it impregnated the goddess of the earth Gaea, thus giving birth to a baby boy, who was named Erechtheus. Athena took Erechtheus and hid him in a box; she then gave the box to Pandrosus and her sisters, telling them never to open it. However, the three sisters were very curious about the contents and opened it. According to a version of the myth, they saw a snake wrapped around the baby; another version has it that the baby itself was half human and half serpent. In both versions, upon seeing inside, the sisters went mad and committed suicide by falling off the Acropolis.

See Also: Cecrops, Aglaurus, Herse, Cecrops, Erechtheus, Athena, Hephaestus

Pandrosus Q&A

Who was Pandrosus?

Pandrosus was the daughter of the first king of Athens, Cecrops, in Greek mythology, and the sister of Aglaurus and Herse. The three sisters played a role in the myth of Erechtheus, the king that succeeded Cecrops on the Athenian throne.

Who were the parents of Pandrosus?

The parent of Pandrosus was Cecrops.

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