Aeolus

Aeolus

Aeolus

Aeolus was a name given to three mythical characters, but their myths are deeply intertwined in such a fashion that the characters are often difficult to tell apart.

However, the most famous of them was the son of Hippotes that is mentioned in Homer's Odyssey as the Keeper of the Winds; in this myth, Aeolus gave Odysseus a closed bag that contained all winds, but for the gentle West Wind that would take him home. However, Odysseus' companions, thinking the bag contained riches, opened the bag and the winds escaped, blowing the ship in all directions and thus extending their voyage back home. Aeolus was later considered to have been a god rather than a mortal as depicted in the Odyssey. He had twelve children, six sons and six daughters.

Another Aeolus was the son of Hellen and Orseis, and ruler of Aeolia. He married Enarete, with whom he had numerous children, including Sisyphus, Athamas, Cretheus, and Salmoneus. Finally, the third character with the same name was the son of Poseidon and Arne, and was often indistinguishable from the first Aeolus, keeper of the winds.

See Also: Odysseus

Aeolus Q&A

Who was Aeolus?

Aeolus was a name given to three mythical characters, but their myths are deeply intertwined in such a fashion that the characters are often difficult to tell apart. However, the most famous of them was the son of Hippotes that is mentioned in Homer's Odyssey as the Keeper of the Winds.

Who were the parents of Aeolus?

The parent of Aeolus was Hippotes.

See Also

linK/CitE ThiS PagE

You can freely use the content on this page for non-commercial reasons (homework, lessons, school essays or college projects, free online courses) as long as you cite this page as the source.

Written by: The Editors of GreekMythology.com. GreekMythology.com editors write, review and revise subject areas in which they have extensive knowledge based on their working experience or advanced studies.

For MLA style citation use: GreekMythology.com, The Editors of Website. "Aeolus". GreekMythology.com Website, 31 Jan. 2015, https://www.greekmythology.com/Other_Gods/Aeolus/aeolus.html. Accessed 23 July 2021.

X