Crius

Crius

Crius

Crius was one of the Titans, son of Uranus and Gaea. He married Eurybia, daughter of Pontus and Gaea, and had three children, Astraios, Pallas and Perses.

Crius grandchildren

  • From the marriage of Astraios (god of dusk) and Eos (goddess of dawn): the four Anemoi (Winds - Boreas, Notus, Eurus, Zephyrus), and the five Astra Planeta (Wandering Stars, meaning planets - Phainon, Phaethon, Puroeis, Eosphoros, Stilbon).
  • From the marriage of Pallas (god of warcraft) and Styx (goddess of the homonymous river): Zelus (glory), Nike (victory), Kratos (power), Via (force), Scylla, Fontes (fountains), and Lacus (lakes).
  • From the marriage of Perses (god of destruction) and Asteria (the starry one): Hecate (goddess of wilderness, childbirth, and magic).

The four pillars of the heavens

Crius was considered one of the four pillars that hold the heavens and the earth apart. He represented the pillar of the south, while the other three pillars were personified by his brothers Iapetus, Coeus and Hyperion. The four brothers had an important role during the dethroning of their father, Uranus; as they were in the four corners of the earth, they held Uranus in place, while their brother Cronus castrated him with a sickle that their mother had given them.

Titanomachy

In the Titanomachy, the war between the Titans and the Olympians, Crius participated siding with the Titans, but did not have a specific role. When the Titans were defeated, Crius along with the rest of his siblings was thrown into Tartarus, the lower level of the Underworld.

See Also: Titans, Uranus, Gaea, Eurybia, Iapetus, Coeus, Hyperion

Video

Crius Q&A

Who was Crius?

Crius was one of the Titans, son of Uranus and Gaea. He married Eurybia, daughter of Pontus and Gaea, and had three children, Astraios, Pallas and Perses.

Who were the parents of Crius?

The parents of Crius were Uranus and Gaea.

Who was the consort of Crius?

Crius' consort was Eurybia.

How many children did Crius have?

Crius had 3 children: Astraios, Pallas and Perses.

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