Creon

Creon

Creon

Creon was the name of different figures in Greek mythology, the most important being the ruler of Thebes in the myth of Oedipus. He was married to Eurydice, with whom he had seven children. Along with his sister Jocasta, they were descendants of Cadmus and the Spartoi.

In the myth of Oedipus, Creon ascended to the throne of Thebes, when the previous king Laius died on his journey to the oracle of Delphi. The mythical monster Sphinx went close to the city of Thebes, killing anyone it would meet that could not answer its riddles. Creon, being desperate about the monster that plagued the area, offered the Theban throne and his sister's hand in marriage to anyone who would be able to kill it. Oedipus managed to answer the Sphinx' riddle, causing its demise, and married Jocasta, not knowing that she was his mother.

Creon also appears in another myth, that of Antigone. Oedipus' sons, Eteocles and Polynices, shared the throne of Thebes, but after a fight, Polynices was exiled. The defeated brother returned with an army and attacked Thebes in the storyline of Seven Against Thebes. Although Thebes did not fall, both Eteocles and Polynices died in the conflict, and Creon became the new ruler. Eteocles was buried with full honour, but Polynices was left to rot for punishment of turning against the city. Antigone, sister of Polynices and the beloved of Creon's son, secretly buried her brother, causing the wrath of Creon; he decreed that she be buried in a tomb alive. Later, having a change of heart after his son's plea, Creon decided to free Antigone, only to find her having taken her own life by hanging herself. Haemon, Creon's son, in despair, initially threatened to kill his father but eventually took his own life.

See Also: Eurydice, Oedipus, Jocasta, Antigone, Polynices, Eteocles, Haemon

Creon Q&A

Who was Creon?

Creon was the name of different figures in Greek mythology, the most important being the ruler of Thebes in the myth of Oedipus. He was married to Eurydice, with whom he had seven children.

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