Achaeans

Achaeans

Achaeans

The Achaeans is the name of the people inhabiting in the area of Achaea in Greece. However, its definition changed throughout history. Homer used the term in his epics, Iliad and Odyssey, to collectively describe the Greeks. Other collective names were also used, the most common being Danaans and Argives. The Greeks Homer referred to probably belonged to the Mycenaean civilisation that was prevalent in Greece from 1600 BC until 1100 BC. There has been no consensus among scholars as to who the Homeric Achaeans really were and whether they had a connection to the historic Achaeans and inhabitants of Achaea. In Greek mythology, the Achaeans were the descendants of Achaeus, grandson of Hellen and father of all Greeks. According to Hyginus, during the ten year conflict in Troy, 22 Achaeans killed 362 Trojans.

See Also: Trojan War, Achilles, Odysseus

Achaeans Q&A

Who was Achaeans?

The Achaeans is the name of the people inhabiting in the area of Achaea in Greece. However, its definition changed throughout history.

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