Troy

Troy

Troy the Movie

Troy is an epic adventure war film directed by Wolfgang Petersen that was originally released in 2004. It was written by David Benioff and the cast includes such names as Brad Pitt, Eric Bana, Orlando Bloom, Brian Cox, Sean Bean and Peter O'Toole. The story is based on the Homeric epic Iliad, but extends its narration to include all of the events of the Trojan War.

The film starts with the army of Mycenae, led by King Agamemnon, about to start a battle against the troops of Thessaly, led by Triopas. Just before the battle, though, Achilles challenged the Thessalian champion in single combat and defeated him, thus ending the fight before it started. In Sparta, King Menelaus met with the princes of Troy, Hector and Paris, in an effort to negotiate a peace treaty; however, Paris, who secretly had an affair with Menelaus' wife, Helen, left with her for Troy. Soon, Menelaus summoned his brother Agamemnon, and agreed to declare war on Troy. Agamemnon had always wanted to march against the city, as conquering it would give him full control of the Aegean Sea. Towards this cause, other noble men of Greece joined, including King Odysseus of Ithaca, and Achilles. The latter initially declined as he had a rivalry with Agamemnon, but he changed his mind when his mother Thetis told him he would be remembered forever but he would die towards the end of the war.

When the princes of Troy returned home with Helen, their father, King Priam, was shocked, but welcomed the queen as an honourable guest. Soon, the Greek army appeared on the shores of Troy and managed to occupy them swiftly, while also sacking a temple of Apollo. Achilles took the priestess of Apollo, Briseis, as a trophy, but after Agamemnon claimed her for himself, Achilles decided not to help the Mycenaean king when the siege of the city started.

The two armies met outside the Trojan walls, and Paris proposed a duel between himself and Menelaus for Helen's hand, instead of a battle. Agamemnon accepted, although secretly, he was going to invade the city anyway. In the duel, Menelaus almost killed Paris, but Hector intervened and killed Menelaus instead. A battle followed, in which many of Agamemnon's soldiers were killed by Trojan archers. Agamemnon ordered his troops to fall back, and offered Briseis to the soldiers in order to boost their morale. Before she was raped, though, Achilles saved her, and then decided he would leave the following morning, thinking the war was a lost cause.

During the night, the Trojans invaded the beach where the Greek army was based. Hector duelled Patroclus, Achilles' cousin, thinking it was Achilles himself, and killed him. The following day, Achilles learned of his cousin's death and went outside the Trojan walls seeking revenge. He demanded to duel with Hector, who accepted; the two men fought resulting in Hector's death. Achilles dragged Hector's corpse back to the Greek camp, and was later visited by a disguised Priam, imploring the hero to give his son's body for a proper burial. Achilles agreed and also released Briseis, telling Priam there would be a twelve-day truce for the funeral. When Agamemnon found out, he was infuriated and decided to attack the city no matter what. Odysseus, afraid of how this might end, proposed that a huge wooden horse be built; he also said that they should conceal their ships so that it would seem that the Greek army had left. Priam, fooled by Odysseus' plan, brought the horse inside the city believing it was a gift from the gods. That night, the Greek soldiers that had hidden inside the hollow horse attacked the Trojans and the sack of the city began. Many heroes were killed and eventually, the city fell to the hands of the Greek army. The film ended with the funerals of the Greek heroes that fell. You can also enjoy all the thrills and adventures of Ancient Troy by playing the Ancient Troy Slot Game!

See Also: Trojan War, Agamemnon, Achilles, Menelaus, Hector, Paris, Helen, Priam, Odysseus, Thetis, Apollo, Briseis, Patroclus

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