Hecatoncheires

Hecatoncheires

Hecatoncheires

The Hecatoncheires were giant creatures in Greek mythology. Their name means "hundred - handed ones", and apart from a hundred hands of unfathomable strength, they also had fifty heads.

Hecatoncheires' Family and Role

They were children of the Titans Uranus and Gaea; they were three, Briareus or Aegaeon (the vigorous or the sea goat), Cottus (the striker or the furious) and Gyges (the big-limbed). The natural forces that were represented by the Hecatoncheires were the earthquakes and the huge sea waves.

Hecatoncheires' imprisoned

Uranus, their father, threw them into Gaea's womb, which infuriated her; thus, this started her plotting towards the overthrow of her husband. She helped her son Cronus defeat his father, but when he came into power, he also imprisoned them in Tartarus.

Hecatoncheires in Titanomachy

During the Titanomachy, the War between the Titans and the Olympians, Gaea sided with Zeus and told him to free the Cyclopes as they would be worthy allies; thanks to their help, the Titans were overthrown and Zeus made them the guards of Tartarus.

See Also: Uranus, Gaia, Cronus, Zeus

Video

Hecatoncheires Q&A

Who was Hecatoncheires?

The Hecatoncheires were giant creatures in Greek mythology. Their name means "hundred - handed ones", and apart from a hundred hands of unfathomable strength, they also had fifty heads.

Who were the parents of Hecatoncheires?

The parents of Hecatoncheires were Uranus and Gaea.

linK/CitE ThiS PagE

You can freely use the content on this page for non-commercial reasons (homework, lessons, school essays or college projects, free online courses) as long as you cite this page as the source.

Written by: The Editors of GreekMythology.com. GreekMythology.com editors write, review and revise subject areas in which they have extensive knowledge based on their working experience or advanced studies.

For MLA style citation use: GreekMythology.com, The Editors of Website. "Hecatoncheires". GreekMythology.com Website, 09 Apr. 2021, https://www.greekmythology.com/Myths/Creatures/Hecatoncheires/hecatoncheires.html. Accessed 14 May 2021.

X