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Myths of Babylonia and Assyria

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MYTHS OF BABYLONIA AND ASSYRIA

Donald A. Mackenzie


List of Figures

1. TEMPTATION OF THE EA-BANI
2. BABYLONIA AND ASSYRIA
I.1. EXAMPLES OF RACIAL TYPES
I.2. STATUE OF A ROYAL PERSONAGE OR OFFICIAL OF NON-SEMITIC ORIGIN
III.1. WORSHIP OF THE MOON GOD
III.2. WINGED MAN-HEADED LION
IV.1. TWO FIGURES OF DEMONS
IV.2. WINGED HUMAN-HEADED COW (?)
V.1. ISHTAR IN HADES
V.2. Female figure in adoration before a goddess
V.3. The winged Ishtar above the rising sun god, the river god, and other deities
V.4. Gilgamesh in conflict with bulls (see page 176)
V.5. PLAQUE OF UR-NINA
VI.1. SILVER VASE DEDICATED TO THE GOD NIN-GIRSU BY ENTEMENA
VI.2. STELE OF NARAM SIN
VII.1. STATUE OF GUDEA
VII.2. "THE SEVEN TABLETS OF CREATION"
VII.3. MERODACH SETS FORTH TO ATTACK TIAMAT
VIII.1. THE SLAYING OF THE BULL OF ISHTAR
IX.1. THE BABYLONIAN DELUGE
IX.2. SLIPPER-SHAPED COFFIN MADE OF GLAZED EARTHENWARE
IX.3. STELE OF HAMMURABI, WITH "CODE OF LAWS"
X.1. THE BABYLONIAN MARRIAGE MARKET
XI.1. HAMMURABI RECEIVING THE "CODE OF LAWS" FROM THE SUN GOD
XI.2. THE HORSE IN WARFARE
XII.1. LETTER FROM TUSHRATTA, KING OF MITANNI, TO AMENHOTEP III, KING OF EGYPT
XII.2. THE GOD NINIP AND ANOTHER DEITY
XIII.1. SYMBOLS OF DEITIES AS ASTRONOMICAL SIGNS
XIII.2. ASHUR SYMBOLS
XIV.1. WINGED DEITIES KNEELING BESIDE A SACRED TREE
XIV.2. EAGLE-HEADED WINGED DEITY (ASHUR)
XVI.1. ASSYRIAN KING HUNTING LIONS
XVI.2. TYRIAN GALLEY PUTTING OUT TO SEA
XVII.1. STATUE OF ASHUR-NATSIR-PAL, WITH INSCRIPTIONS
XVII.2. DETAILS FROM SECOND SIDE OF BLACK OBELISK OF SHALMANESER III
XVIII.1. THE SHEPHERD FINDS THE BABE SEMIRAMIS
XIX.1. STATUE OF NEBO
XIX.2. TIGLATH-PLESSER IV IN HIS CHARIOT
XIX.3. COLOSSAL WINGED AND HUMAN-HEADED BULL AND MYTHOLOGICAL BEING
XIX.4. ASSAULT ON THE CITY OF ALAMMU (? JERUSALEM) BY THE ASSYRIANS UNDER SENNACHERIB
XX.1. ASHUR-BANI-PAL RECLINING IN A BOWER
XX.2. PERSIANS BRINGING CHARIOTS, RINGS, AND WREATHS

Preface

This volume deals with the myths and legends of Babylonia and Assyria, and as these reflect the civilization in which they developed, a historical narrative has been provided, beginning with the early Sumerian Age and concluding with the periods of the Persian and Grecian Empires. Over thirty centuries of human progress are thus passed under review.

During this vast interval of time the cultural influences emanating from the Tigro-Euphrates valley reached far-distant shores along the intersecting avenues of trade, and in consequence of the periodic and widespread migrations of peoples who had acquired directly or indirectly the leavening elements of Mesopotamian civilization. Even at the present day traces survive in Europe of the early cultural impress of the East; our "Signs of the Zodiac", for instance, as well as the system of measuring time and space by using 60 as a basic numeral for calculation, are inheritances from ancient Babylonia.


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