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Myths and Legends of the Celtic Race

Page: 215

mortally wounded by Erc, 232;
defends Cuchulain, 233
Gronw Pebyr (gron´oo payber).
Loved by Blodeuwedd, 383;
slain by Llew, 384
Guairy, Hugh (gwai´ry).
Arrested for murder, and tried at Tara by Dermot, 48
Guary (gwar´y).
High King;
taunts Sanchan Torpest about the “Tain,” 234
Guest, Lady Charlotte.
Her collections of tales, 412
See “Mabinogion”
Gwalchmai.
Nephew of King Arthur, 401
Gwawl.
Rival of Pwyll's for Rhiannon's hand, 362
Gwenhwyvar (gwen´hoo-ivar).
Wife of King Arthur, 394
Gwern.
Son of Matholwch and Branwen, 368;
assumes sovranty of Ireland, 370
Gwion Bach. Son of Gwreang;
put to stir magic cauldron by Ceridwen, 413;
similar action to Finn, 413
Gwlwlyd (goo-loo´lid).
The dun oxen of, 390
Gwreang (goo´re-ang).
Father of Gwion Bach, 413
Gwrnach (goor-nach).
Giant;
the sword of the, 390
Gwyddno Gar´anhir.
Horses of, drink of poisoned stream, hence the stream “Poison of the Horses of,” 413;
his son Elphin finds Taliesin, 414
Gwydion.
Son of Dōn;
place in Cymric mythology taken later by the god Artaius, 349;
nephew of Māth, 378;
the swine of Pryderi and, 380
Gwyn ap Nudd.
A Cymric deity likened to Finn (Gaelic) and to Odin (Norse), 349;
combat every May-day between Gwythur ap Greidawl and, 388
Gwynedd.
Māth, lord of, 378
Gwynfyd.
Purity;
the second of three concentric circles representing the totality of being in the Cymric cosmogony, in which life is manifested as a pure, rejoicing force triumphant over evil, 334
Gwythur ap Greidawl (Victor, Son of Scorcher).
Combat every May-day between Gwyn ap Nudd and, 388
H
Hades (or Annwn).
The Magic Cauldron part of the spoils of, 410
Ham´ilcar.
Defeat of, at Himera, by Gelon, 22
Hamitic, The.
Preserved in syntax of Celtic languages, 78
Havgan.
Rival of Arawn;
mortally wounded by Pwyll, 358
Hecatæ´us of Abdera.
Musical services of Celts (probably of Great Britain) described by, 58
Hecatæus of Miletus.
First extant mention of “Celts” by, 17
Heilyn.
Son of Gwynn, 372
Heinin.
Bard at Arthur's court, 416
Hellan´icus of Lesbos.
Celts and, 17
Hero´dotus.
Celts and, 56
Hevydd Hēn.
Father of Rhiannon, 360
High Kings of Ireland.
Stone of Destiny used for crowning of, 105
Hill of Ainé.
Name of goddess Ainé clings to, 128;
Ainé appears, on a St. John's Night, among girls on, 128
Hill of Allen.
Finn's hounds, while returning to, recognise Saba, 266;
Oisīn returns to, 273;
Finn returns to, 278;
return of the Fianna to, to celebrate the wedding feast of Finn and Tasha, 295;
Finn bears Grania as his bride to, 304
[pg 441]
Hill of Keshcorran. Finn bewitched by hags on, 277
Hill of Macha. Significance, 251
Historia Britonum. See Nennius
Historia Regum Britaniæ. See Geoffrey of Monmouth.
Furnished subject for “Gorborduc” and “King Lear,” 338;
wonderful success of, translated by Wace into French, by Layamon into Anglo-Saxon, 339
Homer. His gloomy picture of the departed souls of men conducted to the underworld, 80;
reference to, 147
Horses of Mananan. White-crested waves called, 125
Hound of Ulster. See 233;
element in Gaelic names, 184
Hugh. One of the Children of Lir, 142
Hull, Miss, referred to, 203, note
Hungary. Miled's name as a god in a Celtic inscription from, 130
Hyde, Dr. Douglas. Reference to his folk tale about Dermot of the Love Spot. 291
Hyperbor´eans. Equivalent to Celts, 17
I
Iberians Aquitani and, resemblance between, 59
Ilda´nach (“The All-Craftsman”). Surname conferred upon Lugh, the Sun-god, 113
Illyrians Celts conquer, 22
Immortality. Origin of so-called “Celtic” doctrine of, 76;
Egyptian and “Celtic” ideas of, 89
India. Dolmens found in, 53;
symbol of the feet found in, 77;
practice in, of allotting musical modes to seasons of the year, 118
Indra. Hindu sky-deity corresponding to Brown Bull of Quelgny, 203
Ingcel. One-eyed chief, son of King of Great Britain, an exile, 169
Invasion Myths, The, of Ireland. See Myths
Inversken´a Ancient name of Kenmore River, so called after Skena, 133
Ireland Unique historical position of, 35;
Dermot mac Kerval, High King of, 47;
apostolised by St Patrick, 51;
Lowland Celts founders of lake-dwellings in, 56;
holy wells in, 66;
tumulus and symbolic carvings at New Grange in, 72;
reference to conversion of, to Christianity, 83;
Lugh, or Lugus, god of Light, in, 88;
history of, as related by Tuan, 100;
Nemed takes possession of, 98;
Fomorians establish tyranny over, 101;
Standish O'Grady's “Critical History of,” reference to, 120;
displacement of Danaans in, by Milesians, 130;
Ith's coming to, 136;
name of Eriu (dative form Erinn), poetic name applied to, 132;
Amergin's lay, sung on touching soil of, 134;
Milesian host invade, 135;
the Children of Miled enter upon sovranty of, but henceforth there are two Irelands, the spiritual, occupied by the Danaans, and the earthly by the Milesians, 145;
Eremon, first Milesian king of all, 144;
reference to Christianity and paganism in, 145;
Milesian settlement of, 148;
Ollav Fōla, most distinguished Ollav of, 150;
Maon reigns over, 154;
raid of Conary's foster-brothers in, 169;
The Terrible decides the Championship of, 196;
proclaims Cuchulain Champion of, 196;
Naisi and Deirdre land in, 199;
Cairbry, son of Cormac mac Art, High King of, 304;

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