Hesiod, The Homeric Hymns, and Homerica

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Scholiast on Apollonius Rhodius, Arg. ii. 297: Hesiod also says that those with Zetes 1734 turned and prayed to Zeus: 'There they prayed to the lord of Aenos who reigns on high.'

Apollonius indeed says it was Iris who made Zetes and his following turn away, but Hesiod says Hermes.

Scholiast on Apollonius Rhodius, Arg. ii. 296: Others say (the islands) were called Strophades, because they turned there and prayed Zeus to seize the Harpies. But according to Hesiod... they were not killed.

Fragment #43—Philodemus 1735, On Piety, 10: Nor let anyone mock at Hesiod who mentions.... or even the Troglodytes and the Pygmies.

Fragment #44—Strabo, i. p. 43: No one would accuse Hesiod of ignorance though he speaks of the Half-dog people and the Great-Headed people and the Pygmies.

Fragment #45—Scholiast on Apollonius Rhodius, Arg. iv. 284: But Hesiod says they (the Argonauts) had sailed in through the Phasis.

Scholiast on Apollonius Rhodius, Arg. iv. 259: But Hesiod (says).... they came through the Ocean to Libya, and so, carrying the Argo, reached our sea.

Fragment #46—Scholiast on Apollonius Rhodius, Arg. iii. 311: Apollonius, following Hesiod, says that Circe came to the island over against Tyrrhenia on the chariot of the Sun. And he called it Hesperian, because it lies toward the west.

Fragment #47—Scholiast on Apollonius Rhodius, Arg. iv. 892: He (Apollonius) followed Hesiod who thus names the island of the Sirens: 'To the island Anthemoessa (Flowery) which the son of Cronos gave them.'

And their names are Thelxiope or Thelxinoe, Molpe and Aglaophonus 1736.

Scholiast on Homer, Od. xii. 168: Hence Hesiod said that they charmed even the winds.

Fragment #48—Scholiast on Homer, Od. i. 85: Hesiod says that Ogygia is within towards the west, but Ogygia lies over against Crete: '...the Ogygian sea and......the island Ogygia.'

Fragment #49—Scholiast on Homer, Od. vii. 54: Hesiod regarded Arete as the sister of Alcinous.

Fragment #50—Scholiast on Pindar, Ol. x. 46: Her Hippostratus (did wed), a scion of Ares, the splendid son of Phyetes, of the line of Amarynces, leader of the Epeians.

Fragment #51—Apollodorus, i. 8.4.1: When Althea was dead, Oeneus married Periboea, the daughter of Hipponous. Hesiod says that she was seduced by Hippostratus the son of Amarynces and that her father Hipponous sent her from Olenus in Achaea to Oeneus because he was far away from Hellas, bidding him kill her.

'She used to dwell on the cliff of Olenus by the banks of wide Peirus.'

Fragment #52—Diodorus 1737 v. 81: Macareus was a son of Crinacus the son of Zeus as Hesiod says... and dwelt in Olenus in the country then called Ionian, but now Achaean.

Fragment #53—Scholiast on Pindar, Nem. ii. 21: Concerning the Myrmidons Hesiod speaks thus: 'And she conceived and bare Aeacus, delighting in horses. Now when he came to the full measure of desired youth, he chafed at being alone. And the father of men and gods made all the ants that were in the lovely isle into men and wide-girdled women. These were the first who fitted with thwarts ships with curved sides, and the first who used sails, the wings of a sea-going ship.'

Fragment #54—Polybius, v. 2: 'The sons of Aeacus who rejoiced in battle as though a feast.'

Fragment #55—Porphyrius, Quaest. Hom. ad Iliad. pertin. p. 93: He has indicated the shameful deed briefly by the phrase 'to lie with her against her will', and not like Hesiod who recounts at length the story of Peleus and the wife of Acastus.

Fragment #56—Scholiast on Pindar, Nem. iv. 95: 'And this seemed to him (Acastus) in his mind the best plan; to keep back himself, but to hide beyond guessing the beautiful knife which the very famous Lame One had made for him, that in seeking it alone over steep Pelion, he (Peleus) might be slain forthwith by the mountain-bred Centaurs.'

Fragment #57—Voll. Herculan. (Papyri from Herculaneum), 2nd Collection, viii. 105: The author of the "Cypria" 1738 says that Thetis avoided wedlock with Zeus to please Hera; but that Zeus was angry and swore that she should mate with a mortal. Hesiod also has the like account.

Fragment #58—Strassburg Greek Papyri 55 (2nd century A.D.): (ll. 1-13) 'Peleus the son of Aeacus, dear to the deathless gods, came to Phthia the mother of flocks, bringing great possessions from spacious Iolcus. And all the people envied him in their hearts seeing how he had sacked the well-built city, and accomplished his joyous marriage; and they all spake this word: "Thrice, yea, four times blessed son of Aeacus, happy Peleus! For far-seeing Olympian Zeus has given you a wife with many gifts and the blessed gods have brought your marriage fully to pass, and in these halls you go up to the holy bed of a daughter of Nereus. Truly the father, the son of Cronos, made you very pre-eminent among heroes and honoured above other men who eat bread and consume the fruit of the ground."'

Fragment #59—1739 Origen, Against Celsus, iv. 79: 'For in common then were the banquets, and in common the seats of deathless gods and mortal men.'

Fragment #60—Scholiast on Homer, Il. xvi. 175: ...whereas Hesiod and the rest call her (Peleus' daughter) Polydora.

Fragment #61—Eustathius, Hom. 112. 44 sq: It should be observed that the ancient narrative hands down the account that Patroclus was even a kinsman of Achilles; for Hesiod says that Menoethius the father of Patroclus, was a brother of Peleus, so that in that case they were first cousins.

Fragment #62—Scholiast on Pindar, Ol. x. 83: Some write 'Serus the son of Halirrhothius', whom Hesiod mentions: 'He (begot) Serus and Alazygus, goodly sons.' And Serus was the son of Halirrhothius Perieres' son, and of Alcyone.

Fragment #63—Pausanias 1740, ii. 26. 7: This oracle most clearly proves that Asclepius was not the son of Arsinoe, but that Hesiod or one of Hesiod's interpolators composed the verses to please the Messenians.

Scholiast on Pindar, Pyth. iii. 14: Some say (Asclepius) was the son of Arsinoe, others of Coronis. But Asclepiades says that Arsinoe was the daughter of Leucippus, Perieres' son, and that to her and Apollo Asclepius and a daughter, Eriopis, were born: 'And she bare in the palace Asclepius, leader of men, and Eriopis with the lovely hair, being subject in love to Phoebus.'

And of Arsinoe likewise: 'And Arsinoe was joined with the son of Zeus and Leto and bare a son Asclepius, blameless and strong.' 1741

Fragment #67—Scholiast on Euripides, Orestes 249: Steischorus says that while sacrificing to the gods Tyndareus forgot Aphrodite and that the goddess was angry and made his daughters twice and thrice wed and deserters of their husbands.... And Hesiod also says:

(ll. 1-7) 'And laughter-loving Aphrodite felt jealous when she looked on them and cast them into evil report. Then Timandra deserted Echemus and went and came to Phyleus, dear to the deathless gods; and even so Clytaemnestra deserted god-like Agamemnon and lay with Aegisthus and chose a worse mate; and even so Helen dishonoured the couch of golden-haired Menelaus.'

Fragment #68—1742 Berlin Papyri, No. 9739: (ll. 1-10) '....Philoctetes sought her, a leader of spearmen, .... most famous of all men at shooting from afar and with the sharp spear. And he came to Tyndareus' bright city for the sake of the Argive maid who had the beauty of golden Aphrodite, and the sparkling eyes of the Graces; and the dark-faced daughter of Ocean, very lovely of form, bare her when she had shared the embraces of Zeus and the king Tyndareus in the bright palace.... (And.... sought her to wife offering as gifts)