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Hesiod, The Homeric Hymns, and Homerica

Page: 1

Produced by Douglas B. Killings, and David Widger



HESIOD,
THE HOMERIC HYMNS,
AND HOMERICA



This file contains translations of the following works: Hesiod: "Works and Days", "The Theogony", fragments of "The Catalogues of Women and the Eoiae", "The Shield of Heracles" (attributed to Hesiod), and fragments of various works attributed to Hesiod.

Homer: "The Homeric Hymns", "The Epigrams of Homer" (both attributed to Homer).

Various: Fragments of the Epic Cycle (parts of which are sometimes attributed to Homer), fragments of other epic poems attributed to Homer, "The Battle of Frogs and Mice", and "The Contest of Homer and Hesiod".

This file contains only that portion of the book in English; Greek texts are excluded. Where Greek characters appear in the original English text, transcription in CAPITALS is substituted.



Project Gutenberg Editor's Note: 266 footnotes notes previously scattered through the text have been moved to the end of the file and each given an unique number. There are links to and from each footnote.






CONTENTS


PREPARER'S NOTE:

PREFACE


INTRODUCTION

General

The Boeotian School

The Hesiodic Poems

I. "The Works and Days":

II. The Genealogical Poems:

Date of the Hesiodic Poems

Literary Value of Homer

The Ionic School

The Trojan Cycle

The Homeric Hymns

The Epigrams of Homer

The Burlesque Poems

The Contest of Homer and Hesiod


BIBLIOGRAPHY


THE WORKS OF HESIOD

THE DIVINATION BY BIRDS (fragments)

THE ASTRONOMY (fragments)

THE PRECEPTS OF CHIRON (fragments)

THE GREAT WORKS (fragments)

THE THEOGONY (1,041 lines)

THE CATALOGUES OF WOMEN AND EOIAE

THE SHIELD OF HERACLES (480 lines)

THE MARRIAGE OF CEYX (fragments)

THE GREAT EOIAE (fragments)

THE MELAMPODIA (fragments)

AEGIMIUS (fragments)

FRAGMENTS OF UNKNOWN POSITION

DOUBTFUL FRAGMENTS


WORKS ATTRIBUTED TO HOMER

THE HOMERIC HYMNS

I. TO DIONYSUS (21 lines) [2501]

II. TO DEMETER (495 lines)

III. TO APOLLO (546 lines)

IV. TO HERMES (582 lines)

V. TO APHRODITE (293 lines)

VI. TO APHRODITE (21 lines)

VII. TO DIONYSUS (59 lines)

VIII. TO ARES (17 lines)

IX. TO ARTEMIS (9 lines)

X. TO APHRODITE (6 lines)

XI. TO ATHENA (5 lines)

XII. TO HERA (5 lines)

XIII. TO DEMETER (3 lines)

XIV. TO THE MOTHER OF THE GODS (6 lines)

XV. TO HERACLES THE LION-HEARTED (9 lines)

XVI. TO ASCLEPIUS (5 lines)

XVII. TO THE DIOSCURI (5 lines)

XVIII. TO HERMES (12 lines)

XIX. TO PAN (49 lines)

XX. TO HEPHAESTUS (8 lines)

XXI. TO APOLLO (5 lines)

XXII. TO POSEIDON (7 lines)

XXIII. TO THE SON OF CRONOS, MOST HIGH (4 lines)

XXIV. TO HESTIA (5 lines)

XXV. TO THE MUSES AND APOLLO (7 lines)

XXVI. TO DIONYSUS (13 lines)

XXVII. TO ARTEMIS (22 lines)

XXVIII. TO ATHENA (18 lines)

XXIX. TO HESTIA (13 lines)

XXX. TO EARTH THE MOTHER OF ALL (19 lines)

XXXI. TO HELIOS (20 lines)

XXXII. TO SELENE (20 lines)

XXXIII. TO THE DIOSCURI (19 lines)


HOMER'S EPIGRAMS

FRAGMENTS OF THE EPIC CYCLE

THE WAR OF THE TITANS (fragments)

THE STORY OF OEDIPUS (fragments)

THE THEBAID (fragments)

THE EPIGONI (fragments)

THE CYPRIA (fragments)

THE AETHIOPIS (fragments)

THE LITTLE ILIAD (fragments)

THE SACK OF ILIUM (fragments)

THE RETURNS (fragments)

THE TELEGONY (fragments)

NON-CYCLIC POEMS ATTRIBUTED TO HOMER

THE EXPEDITION OF AMPHIARAUS (fragments)

THE TAKING OF OECHALIA (fragments)

THE PHOCAIS (fragments)

THE MARGITES (fragments)

THE CERCOPES (fragments)

THE BATTLE OF FROGS AND MICE (303 lines)


OF THE ORIGIN OF HOMER AND HESIOD, AND OF THEIR CONTEST


ENDNOTES:










PREPARER'S NOTE:

In order to make this file more accessible to the average computer user, the preparer has found it necessary to re-arrange some of the material. The preparer takes full responsibility for his choice of arrangement.

A few endnotes have been added by the preparer, and some additions have been supplied to the original endnotes of Mr. Evelyn-White's. Where this occurs I have noted the addition with my initials "DBK". Some endnotes, particularly those concerning textual variations in the ancient Greek text, are here omitted.





PREFACE

This volume contains practically all that remains of the post-Homeric and pre-academic epic poetry.

I have for the most part formed my own text. In the case of Hesiod I have been able to use independent collations of several MSS. by Dr. W.H.D. Rouse; otherwise I have depended on the apparatus criticus of the several editions, especially that of Rzach (1902). The arrangement adopted in this edition, by which the complete and fragmentary poems are restored to the order in which they would probably have appeared had the Hesiodic corpus survived intact, is unusual, but should not need apology; the true place for the "Catalogues" (for example), fragmentary as they are, is certainly after the "Theogony".


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