BIG SCIENCE ACTION - Dai Kagaku Akushon Picture

This is not going to be a short one.

BIG SCIENCE ACTION! (大科学アクション - Dai Kagaku Akushon)

Grant Morrison introduced Big Science Action in the pages of Final Crisis from DC comics. His plan, I guess, was to make a Japanese JLA comprised of some preexisting DC characters and a bunch he based on Japanese movies and TV shows. At a glance it worked; there was Ultraman and Rising Sun and... a school-girl in a Mad Cat? Silver Surfer on roller blades? And Boss Bōsōzoku? A nuclear powered (one would assume from the name) leader of the Yakuza farm-team? There was also Senior Waveman Kimura (シニアウェーブマン木村 - Shinia Uēbuman Kimura), but the Wavemen were already a Sentai of their own and it made little sense for him to moonlight as Sentai are rather insular.
There were enough things that just didn't work, so I got to kibitzing with celamowari and we (in our infinite wisdom) fixed the lot of it.
The team was supposed to have come together during the Monster Wars, which given DC's sliding timeline could have been just about anywhen, but Rising Sun was a founding member of the Global Guardians about 1958 so that was our starting point. Meant poring over ridiculous amounts of tokusatsu shows and immersing ourselves (in C's case re-immersing himself) in mid-century Japanese Super Heroes.
Referring to the Weird War (fav.me/d8xcgnz) and the great Silver Age Giant Monsters DC was chock full of the question came up “Where did they all come from?”. Broke down to there being Space Monsters and Terrestrial Monsters, and the Space Monsters were attracted to Earth by all the weird radio signals and radiation let loose during WWII and the succeeding Weird War. Dinosaur Island was already a Monster hot spot the original Suicide Squad (www.writeups.org/fiche.php?id=…) played about in, but the first ones out in the world were the Space Monsters. In comes Lordwormm and the Terrestrial Monsters being a defense against the Space Monsters let loose by the Subterraneans of which there were a great many races of varying technological acumen.
SO! The Monsters Wars were a mighty dust-up; not Monsters vs Man, but Earth Monsters vs Space Monsters. Most of this was in the South Pacific, but wherever the rads an' radio drew the Space Monsters there was the home team and rather a bit of property damage. Japan after the war had to have been an interesting place already given what radiation does to the folks who live in comic books, and there was certainly no lack of radiation to draw the Space Monsters...
So we have our monsters and their war, now for those who fight them:

Rising Sun (旭日- Kyokujitsu)
Yasunari Izumi (泉康成 - Izumi Yasunari)
Super Friends v1 #8 1977 DC
Says celamowari:
In looking at Rising Sun's Wikipedia, I noticed it's a little confusing re: his name. They give it as Izumi Yasunari, but I believe this is Japanese order and his family name is Izumi and his given name is Yasunari. Izumi can be both, but I don't think Yasunari works as a surname (at least not as a native name).

(Don't even get me started on Morrison's "Jiro Osamu".)

He was a physicist who wore neither mask nor gloves, so obviously not trying to hide an identity. We figured Rising Sun was just what he was called when not at home, as in Japan he had no need for a nom de spandex. Perhaps affectionately known as Professor Sun (太陽教授 - Taiyō Kyōju) by his fans.
A founding member of Big Science Action and the Global Guardians Professor Izumi had to have begun his hero-ing career prior to '58 in order to be the face of Japan at the Dome.
Yasunari would train Takeo Sato (佐藤武夫 - Satō Takeo) (according to retcon as originally it was Superboy) to replace him as Rising Sun since Sato's only handle was one he stole from the character he played on TV, and man, you know that wouldn't fly. Sato in turn trained Kimiyo Hoshi in the fine art of super hero-ing.
The Hero of Japan, damned near a house-hold name, Professor Sun would be the leader of Big Science Action.

Mister Unknown (ミスタ不詳 - Misutā Fushō)
Batman Incorporated v1 #1 2011
The motorcycle hero has kind of a long history in Japan and since we'd nixed Boss Bōsōzoku seeing as he was far more the villain, we needed a motorcycle hero of our own.
Based more than a bit on Moonlight Mask (月光仮面 - Gekkō Kamen) who debuted in 1958, and Seven Color Mask (七色仮面 - Nanairo Kamen) from 1959, with parts of the Batman Incorporated Mister Unknown costume and a bastardized version of Jiro Osamu's later helmet with the purple coming from Batman's original gloves.
Strangely enough the original Mister Unknown was never named, much like Gekko Kamen, so decided to keep that. He'd slow down as he got older, less action hero more detective, and take on an apprentice, but whatever name he was born with would be a mystery he took to his grave.
The coming together of Big Science Action gave an excuse to make use of Boss Bōsōzoku as a motorcycle villain for Mister Unknown and a nuclear villain for Rising Sun which could easily have brought the two heroes together on previous adventures.

Ultimon (アルティモン - Aruteimon)
Dai Yokohama (横浜大 - Yokohama Dai)
Final Crisis Sketchbook 2008 DC
Deviating greatly from the source material Ultimon was part of a terrestrial Ultimon Society as opposed to Ultraman's alien origins. There was another society Morrison created who's point-man had a big gold helmet, the Q Society and Aztek, and it just seemed, given their shared progenitor that perhaps the societies had a common origin – perhaps a whole team of golden-helmeted space heroes who were wiped out except for their helmets which were the source of their power. The Q Society got the story and the helmet a bit after the fact so conflated it to the mythology they knew – mesoamerican. This of course led to the thinking that there could very well be other helmets and other societies out there.
Dai Yokohama was never seen (to our knowledge) without his suit, so he's sort of loosely based on Susumu Kurobe's Shin Hayata.

Bushido
Meiko Osono (小薗芽衣子 - Osono Meiko)
Titans Annual v1 #1 2000
celamowari says:
One hiccup - "Orsono" isn't a real Japanese name (I know this shocks you at this point). In Japanese, the only consonant sound that can end a syllable is "n". My suggestion is that's it's just a mis-translation of "Osono" which might be written like this. --> 小薗 (that surname has other readings, but Osono is a valid one.)

This one is the result of a Tran-Siberian freight train of thought. As presented in the comics the Bushidos (not using bushidoka because for this lot it's a title) were a clan of government sanctioned monster hunters with Ryuku O(r)sono being either the latest or last in the line. His grandfather(?) died at Hiroshima, his father was killed under undisclosed circumstances, and his mother was killed by tengu.
So we know how Meiko Osono ended up, but obviously she had plenty to do before then. The Bushidos upon death somehow transferred their soul into their weapon (reminiscent of Katana's Soultaker) and so each successive Bushido was walking about with a Jedi Council in their rucksack. The thing is, while these weren't samurai as the samurai had been put out to pasture in the late 1800s, by their name one would assume they had a certain inclination and the samurai had no problem adapting new technologies to the art of killing. Samurai and rifles were sort of a big thing. So, there's no reason to stick with melee weapons when guns are available and if's one's going to update the armoury why would they, who are official representatives of a modern government still rock out the ragged-ass pajamas? And this is the early '60s and the Japanese government was looking at other governments to modernize, and the British had the Avengers, so we get a government pseudo-samurai monster hunter in an Emma Peel catsuit. Makes perfect sense.

Archer Ace (射手A/射手エース)
Seiji Yukigami (雪上征二 - Yukigami Seiji)
Adventure Comics v1 #250 1958
The Ace Archer of Japan and his motorized rickshaw... Unlike most of the Green Arrows of the World old Ace looked exactly like GA save for the pronounced overbite and squint. Only thing to do was go ethnic without making him a cartoon. Thankfully Japan has an amazing history of archers so there was reference, except most of it is related to Kyudo and a 2.5-3meter daikyu would make romping about the rooftops a bit difficult. So mostly went horse archer with the hankyu. And some of that was due to the kinda awesome hat.
Brother of the Rising Sun Archer - Keiji Yukigami (雪上圭二 - Yukigami Keiji) - (Robin v4 #134 2005), so grand uncle to Lisa Yukigami - an assassin and current Rising Sun Archer. Figure older brother was an operative for the Imperials and met an end most inconvenient and potentially messy. Ace then was a government agent like his brother, but a traditionalist. Leads to a nice contrast with his old fashioned sensibilities and Meiko Osono's oh-so-modern ways.
celamowari says:
There was something about Yurigama that bothered me but I couldn't quite put my finger on it. After looking into it, it appears to be a real surname - but not Japanese. Apparently, it's Indonesian. It SOUNDS plausible as a Japanese name but I think it would be four characters long and I don't think that would occur considering the Japanese have laws regarding which kanji can be used in proper names (really).

Sigh. It's easier to accept these from back in the old days when references were hard to find. Now these cats can literally find a list of Japanese surnames online and pick one randomly.

Anyway, trying to preserve the original as closely as I could, I decided on Yukigami.


Cosmo Racer (コスモレーサー - Kosumo Rēsā)
Final Crisis Sketchbook 2008 DC
I know in the sketchbook it says this guy was based on Astro Boy and Space Ace, but it's just not there. He's got an adult frame and musculature and is far more Silver Surfer (including backstory), but there was no good reason to exclude him, so he's our Space Giants without, you know, actually being a giant.
Only real change to his look was going for quads instead of blades on his rocket boots.

Adam One (番アダム - Ichiban Adamu)
and Doctor Isamu Yoneda (米田勇博士 – Yoneda Isamu Hakase)
Honestly? Maybe a bit more Rusty the Boy Robot than Astro Boy (seeing as he's not from the future and all). So, Doctor Yoneda was the father of Tetsujiro Yoneda (Young All-Stars v1 #4 1987), an Imperial operative during the war who was seconded to Axis America towards the end. Tetsujiro would in time be apprehended and executed as a spy. The rest of the Yoneda family was in Nagasaki, while the Doctor was working out of an Imperial research station in Sendai, when the bombs dropped.
With nothing left Doctor Yoneda gave up weapons of war - he had been the creator of the Kamikaze Armor his son wore and the Krakko robots (Weird War Tales v1 #113 1982) which had been at Pearl Harbor – and turned his research to domestic robots.
His greatest success, and so far greatest unrepeatable success, was Adam One. Originally designed as a companion for orphans, Adam was stolen by a doomsday cult and upgraded into a war machine. Doctor Yoneda and a horde of servitor bots and puppets (think House of Dolmann - www.internationalhero.co.uk/d/…) stormed the cult's compound and saved Adam. While Yoneda removed most of the gear the cult had packed into Adam, at the robot boy's request he left the rocket boots and finger laser intact.
Yoneda and Adam have a “family” of half-bright robots and puppets which sometimes cause as much trouble as they solve.

Super Thing 56 (スーパーシング 56号 - Sūpāshingu Gojū Roku-gō)
Sakiko “Saki (さき)” Jono (条野さき子 - Jōno Sakikō) and Doctor Hikari Jono (条野光博士 - Jōno Hikari Hakase)
Military Comics v1 #12 1942 Quality
Way back in '42 Wild Bill Dunn and his Blue Tracer fought a Japanese robot called the Thing. This was an ugly square thing on Baba Yaga chicken legs with maces for hands, and while it could well have been a precursor to Hammersuit Zero X (given the bludgeons in place of useful manipulators) it was more entertaining to try to turn the box on stilts into an era appropriate remote-controlled robot. This of course led to who controlled the thing and since the pilot of the Hammersuit was a schoolgirl and there was Johnny Sokko and his Giant Robot...
Says celamowari
Alright, since you mentioned Johnny, I thought I'd try to do a little punning of my own. For the girl, how about Saki Jono? The 1950s might be a little too early for "Saki" as a proper name, and my guy who might know is on hiatus at the present. But you could always say it was short of "Sakiko" if pressed...

As such, I'm writing Saki in Hiragana to cover our asses. This is not uncommon for females especially, to write names out phonetically.

Working backward from that, I came up with Dr. Hikari Jono for her grandfather. The "Hikari" is the same kanji as the first one in the name of Mitsuteru Yokoyama (creator of both Testujin 28-go and Giant Robo).


Doctor Jono and Doctor Yoneda worked together at the research station in Sendai and while maybe not friends exactly the have a certain Bert and Ernie vibe going with Jono being full of wonder and curiosity about EVERYTHING and Yoneda is one dour son of a bitch (except where Adam is concerned).
Instead of Shotaro Kaneda's remote or Daisaku Kusama's Jimmy Olsen signal watch Saki has a head band that allows communication with the Super Thing. In times of danger antennae pop out of either side for better signal.


Big Science Action is in part government sponsored and the Japanese government runs the immense complex under Mount Fuji where the Kaiju corpses are stored. This is the Monster Graveyard. The Halo circling the top of the mountain was funded by the Ultimon Society, but designed and built to the specifications of the members of Big Science Action. Doctors Jono and Yoneda and Adam One are the only full-time residents of the Halo, but there is a service staff provided by the Ultimon Society.


As there's so very much to break down suffice it to say anything represented here that is property of a corporate entity or individual creator is openly acknowledged as property of said corporate entity or individual creator and used with the utmost respect (for the most part) and no monetary gain what so ever.

Saki, Adam One, the mad doctors, and the things that weren't here before are creations of Bastard-Bird and celamowari although obviously derivative of previous works which is acknowledged where applicable. Most of the research and all of the translating/transliterating by celamowari. Picture and wall-o-text Bastard-Bird.


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