Wonder Woman and Xena Picture

This is part of a collage I made of Lynda Carter as Wonder Woman authentically, and Zack Snyder/Gal Gadot's obvious Xena bases. And I will not apologize for sharing, and not acting like a Warner employee or a cheerleader for everything Warner/DC does.

I expect Wonder Woman to look and act like the character William Moulton Marston and Harry Peter created. Not like the character Robert Tapert and John Schulian created.

Gal Gadot displays the "I am woman, hear me roar" Xena: Warrior Princess battle cry stereotype like a female Conan the Barbarian. As John Byrne said, "William Marston did, indeed, create Wonder Woman to be "Superman for girls." The character was to embody everything that Marston perceived as strong in woman, to be a role model. Sad, too, that some writers cannot make her strong without making her butch. The first rule when making a Wonder Woman movie would be keeping in mind that she is an action hero. She is smart, savvy, elegant and glamorous, but she can kick butt with the best of them."
www.byrnerobotics.com/forum/fo…

William Moulton Marston and Harry Peter's Wonder Woman is the Amazon Princess daughter of Hippolyta, formed from clay, Wonder Woman had a happy childhood on Paradise Island with her loving mother and bonding with her Amazon sisters, she's on a mission to bring the Amazon ideals of love and peace to the warring world of men, and is disguised as American Army nurse/intelligence officer Diana Prince. She has altruistic motives, wants to be trusted, inspire people, and be a positive upstanding role model for the public. Wonder Woman is driven by her mission of peace and love, her ethics, her morals.

Take out the all-ages entertainment elements (which includes non-grown ups), morals, warmth and humor out of Wonder Woman and what do you get? A cynical, angsty, gloomy doomy downer Xena/Blood (New 52) knock off (with a bit of Watchmen/Death of Superman and Dark Knight Returns Batman shtick thrown in, bordering on parody) that limits and polarizes the audience. Not William Moulton Marston and Harry Peter's character. Turning a mass market product into a niche market product, driving away younger audiences (for which the superhero was created). Insane.

But these are dark times so we need a darker, grimmer, jaded Wonder Woman? Wonder Woman was created in the Great Depression, corruption was rampant with mobsters like Al Capone, the Klan were having lynchings of African Americans, and when Nazism was rising up. Those were very dark times. In contrast, Marston's Wonder Woman and Steve Trevor represent the best of humanity. It's just what audiences were needing in the Great Depression, when 2,403 people were killed in Tojo's attack on Pearl Harbor, while Hitler's Nazis were slaughtering children and elderly in Europe. Wonder Woman was the exact opposite of all the sense of hopelessness and turmoil that was going on in the world in the '40s.

Gal Gadot's Diana Prince is the demigoddess daughter of Zeus (a Brian Azzarello New 52 reboot creation) and is a wealthy antiques dealer entrepreneur (Diana as a rich businesswoman is a David E. Kelley TV script creation). She gave up being a hero a hundred years ago. She unheroric explains, "A hundred years ago I walked away from mankind, from a century of horrors. Men made a world where standing together is impossible." She also distracts the Zombie Zod/Doomsday monster instead of defeating it. Her solo movie takes place during World War 1 instead of authentically World War II fighting Nazis. Gal Gadot's Israeli accent is so thick it was hard for some people to make out what she was saying, and the accent destroys William Moulton Marston's American Diana Prince secret identity concept.

Xena was a dark warrior clad in black and wearing upper arm bands, with a battle cry and gritted teeth, riding a black horse, etc. so it was it's own darker thing, and now Zack Snyder/Patty Jenkins/Gal Gadot are copying Xena as a dark warrior clad in black and a darker costume (without the American symbolism) and wearing upper arm bands, with a battle cry and gritted teeth, riding a black horse, etc. Even the Gal Gadot glasses and hat outfit is closer to Xena's glasses and hat look, rather than Diana Prince's nurse uniform or military uniform.

I want all the classic aspects of Woman Woman as she was created to be, Wonder Woman as more then a warrior, Wonder Woman on a mission of peace, romance with Steve Trevor, and Diana Prince the Army nurse/intelligence officer, daughter of Hippolyta etc. A Wonder Woman movie should be a Ray Harryhausen kind of mythological fantasy adventure film with Wonder Woman fighting monsters such as the seven headed Hydra, giant tentacled Kraken, and it should also be a military action movie, and a romance with her and Steve Trevor, and some humor with Etta Candy. Wonder Woman should appeal to both a female and male audience of all ages, including little kids! These are not some silly kiddie book characters to me. These are historic Folklore figures with roots in Greek/Olympian mythology, they should be for an all-ages audience. The '70s TV show didn't have the budget for all that, but a movie could.

Wonder Woman is athletic and has the feminine beauty of Aphrodite, Douglas S. Cramer's casting of Lynda Carter captured that. Douglas Cramer and Bruce Lansbury were the producers. Douglas Cramer said, "Everyone wanted the ideal Wonder Woman to have a certain resemblance, obviously, to the character. We needed a statuesque woman, a buxom woman and an angelic face. And beyond all that we needed someone who could play it, could act and sustain a television movie and a series, hopefully, that would run for a long time. The problem is when your creating myth, everyone has their own vision of that myth. So to set with a director, myself as producer, with Warner Brothers executives, and then the network executives, and come close to everyone's feelings about Wonder Woman was a very difficult task. Whoever we found seemed to have part of the whole equation, they looked good or they were a wonderful actress, but usually if they looked good they couldn't act, or if they were a wonderful actress they approached the job like a lady truck driver." All agreed with Douglas Cramer that Lynda Carter was perfect for the role.

David E. Kelley's casting of Adrianne Palicki, a girl with moles on her face and chest, a large pointy chin, long thick eyebrows, smallish/average breast size, as Wonder Woman gives David E. Kelley's Wonder Woman an imperfect look, which he seems to be going for, to make her relatable, none threatening to the average girl like bony, short, flat chested Ally McBeal was. In the episode "Worlds Without Love", David E. Kelley's Ally McBeal wishes her breasts were bigger. She imagines them getting bigger and bigger. David E. Kelley's Wonder Woman is insecure about her breast size compared to the size of the breasts of a Wonder Woman doll, saying "I wish I had these breasts. Big tit's save lives." The whole thing is out of character, bad writing. Diana as a rich business woman is contrary to her mission to bring the Amazon ideals of love and peace to mans world. Wonder Woman is not a unstable, perennially emotional, sensitive, insecure girl. Zack Snyder's casting of Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman makes Zack Snyder's Wonder Woman as flat chested as a boy, Gal Gadot was so thin you could see her chest bones through her skin, and has an Israeli accent which destroys the American Diana Prince secret identity concept.

I'd cast Tanit Phoenix as Wonder Woman. Tanit is a statuesque woman, a buxom woman with an angelic face. She has the feminine beauty of Aphrodite and is athletic.

Danny Trejo noted about Tanit Phoenix, "Tanit Phoenix. She’s up for the role of Wonder Woman. If she doesn’t get it, they’re idiots. She’s perfect. She looks like Lynda Carter. But naturally Hollywood’s probably got some little bimbo they want. I even told her, 'God, you look like Lynda Carter.'" www.avclub.com/article/danny-t…

Danny Trejo again noted, "Tanit’s up for Wonder Woman right now and they’re insane if they don’t pick her up. She looks like Lynda Carter anyway!" www.hometheaterforum.com/topic…

Tanit Phoenix didn't get the role for David E. Kelley's Wonder Woman, which I'm glad because that was a bastardization that was even rejected by NBC. David E. Kelley chose Adrianne Palicki because he didn't want Lynda Carter's Wonder Woman type, he wanted an Ally McBeal/Xena flawed and insecure, diva drama queen type, which is not Wonder Woman.

Tanit Phoenix has been studying Muay Thai and taekwondo for several years, she always manages to find time for martial arts. Tanit Phoenix said, "My fascination started when my father told me it is a good idea to learn self-defense moves - he said if I ever got in a situation where I would need to protect myself, at least I would know what to do! I'm also interested in taekwondo and have been trained by some of the top trainers in the world. I actually represented the French taekwondo team in a commercial." www.kickboxermag.com.au/featur…
While Tanit Phoenix is a South African actress, she can do a believable American Diana Prince voice.

Tanit Phoenix loves animals. www.facebook.com/TheOfficialTa…
www.facebook.com/TheOfficialTa…

Wonder Woman was based on the ancient Greek mythology of Zeus, Hera, Aphrodite, Perseus, etc. Wonder Woman should be given more than a robe, bracelets and invisible plane. Wonder Woman should be given the shield from Hera (or Athena), magical sword from Aphrodite, Bubo the wise owl from Athena and the owl communicating with Wonder Woman telepathically, and the Pegasus winged horse, gifts from Zeus, as the male Bellerophon and Perseus had been granted, so should Wonder Woman be granted. Plus the golden magic lasso (from Antiope's Golden Girdle of Gaea, empowered Hestia and made into a lasso by Hephaestus), bracelets and invisible jet (cloaking device).

In Sensation Comics #71 (1947) "The Invasion of the Sun Warriors", written by Joye Hummel, art by Wonder Woman co-creator Harry Peter, Wonder Woman has a sword and shield. Queen Flaminaon (inhabitant of the Sun) has a flying winged horse. In Sensation Comics #101 (1951) "Battle for the Atomic World", written by Robert Kanigher, art by Wonder Woman co-creator Harry Peter, Prof. Luxo has a mechanical flying winged horse. In Wonder Woman #128 (1962) "Origin of the Amazing Robot Plane", written by Robert Kanigher, art by Ross Andru, Wonder Woman has the flying winged horse Pegasus (reprinted in Showcase Presents: Wonder Woman #2 (2008)). So it's historically and authentically part of Wonder Woman mythology, not just Clash of the Titans Greek mythology. And just having a sword doesn't make Wonder Woman into Xena. In Wonder Woman #206 (1973) "War of the Wonder Women", written by Cary Bates, art by Nick Cardy and Don Heck, Wonder Woman has a sword. In Wonder Woman #253 (1979) "Spirit of Silver...Soul of Gold", written by Jack Harris, art by Jose Delbo, Wonder Woman has a sword. In Wonder Woman #299 (1983) "Target: Paradise", written by Dan Mishkin, art by Gene Colan, Aegeus has a flying winged horse. In Wonder Woman: Gods and Morals (1986-1987), written by Greg Potter, Len Wein, George Perez, Wonder Woman has a shield. In Wonder Woman: Challenge of the Gods (1987), written by Len Wein and George Perez, Wonder Woman has a shield. In Kingdom Come (1996), written by Mark Waid, art by Alex Ross, Wonder Woman has a shield and sword. An owl that looks like Bubo is on Wonder Woman's shoulder in the cover by artist Adam Hughes to Wonder Woman #139 (1998) "Gods and Monsters", written by Eric Luke. In Wonder Woman #215 (2005) "The Bronze Doors, Part One", written by Greg Rucka, art by J. G. Jones and Rags Morales, Wonder Woman has the flying winged horse Pegasus (reprinted in Wonder Woman: Land of the Dead). In Wonder Woman #216 (2005) The Bronze Doors, Part Two", written by Greg Rucka, art by Rags Morales, Wonder Woman has the flying winged horse Pegasus (reprinted in Wonder Woman: Land of the Dead). In Wonder Woman #217 (2005) "The Bronze Doors, Conclusion", written by Greg Rucka, art by Rags Morales, Wonder Woman has the flying winged horse Pegasus (reprinted in Wonder Woman: Land of the Dead).

Wonder Woman should wear the classic iconic authentic costume as creators
William Moulton Marston and Harry Peter intended, as Lynda Carter wore. As Lynda Carter said about Gal Gadot's Xena style costume: "Well, I was missing the red, white and blue, I have to say." batman-news.com/2014/08/31/lyn…
Lynda Carter said, “You really want to know? I like my costume the best." www.mtv.com/news/2598656/wonde…
Lynda Carter said about Cathy Lee Crosby's costume: "Cathy Lee Crosby did it and it was the wrong costume, the wrong hair color." www.youtube.com/watch?v=koYvZ3…
Douglas S. Cramer said about the costume, "Wonder Woman was that outfit to begin with, and it had to be perfect. I can't tell you how many times we looked at it, looked at fabrics, looked at different cuts, how they looked on Lynda, how they moved and operated, but we were there everyday getting it right." Lynda Carter's buster and panties were made of satin, the eagle on the buster is gold leather, the boots are suede, belt and tiara are gold leather, the bracelets are brass. It replicated the iconic Wonder Woman look from the comics wonderfully. www.youtube.com/watch?v=mtOW35…

I'm glad that reboot show by David E. Kelley was canceled. Trying to turn Wonder Woman into a cross between insecure Ally McBeal and sadistic torturer Hit Girl is something I am against and that bastardized plastic costume. They should get back to the authentic secure compassionate Wonder Woman and cast an actress who actually looks like Wonder Woman, someone like Lynda Carter who actually looked like she stepped out of the comics, and let her wear the iconic costume.
David E. Kelley's Ally McBeal was a perennially emotional girl whose heart was badly bruised by one breakup after another and another and would cry over her ex-boyfriends. David E. Kelley's Wonder Woman cries herself to sleep over her ex-boyfriend, Steve Trevor. David E. Kelley's Steve Trevor is a lawyer, like Ally McBeal's ex. The whole thing is out of character, bad writing. Wonder Woman is not a unstable, perennially emotional, sensitive, insecure girl.

If Lynda Carter was wearing the Gal Gadot costume it would look like Wonder Woman wearing a Xena costume. Is it Halloween? Wonder Woman has worn armor in the comics, which is fine as long as it's not Xena armor. The armor by Alex Ross in Kingdom Come is not Xena armor. Before that George Perez had Wonder Woman wearing armor with a sword and shield back in 1987. It was not Xena armor. It retained Wonder Woman's colors, style, iconography. So it still looks like Wonder Woman and suits the character. Can you not see the difference? Of course you can unless your are color blind. Wonder Woman should wear the classic iconic authentic costume as creators William Moulton Marston and Harry Peter intended, as Lynda Carter wore. As Lynda Carter said about Gal Gadot's Xena costume: "Well, I was missing the red, white and blue, I have to say." Armor should retain the iconic Wonder Woman essence of color and stars, etc. Not Xena armor. Wonder Woman wore battle armor in the Perez update and Kingdom Come comics with skirt when needed. It should not replace her iconic costume. It should retained the iconic Wonder Woman essence of wearing the American flag, the Wonder Woman color scheme, etc. as the creators intended. So it's still recognizably Wonder Woman and not a bastardization.

A movie should be an iconic approach to the character. As Adam Hughes said when describing All-Star Wonder Woman, "This iconic approach to the character, and I’m looking at it the same way as the people who did…say, Batman: The Animated Series. You look over the sixty year history of the character, and treat it like a salad bar. You take the good bits, and leave the rest. You get the best of all possible worlds. Taking the best bits from the Golden Age, the best bits from the George Perez run, and hopefully will come up with something where I can say, 'Aha! A happy, healthy balance.'"

Lynda Carter's costumes were faithful to the comics from the very beginning in the 1940s to decades later as the costume was faithfully modernized subtly while retaining the basic design, American flag symbolism, color scheme, etc. of the original. Obviously Wonder Woman was updated faithfully and to the iconic authenticity on the Lynda Carter show and by comics artists George Perez, Alex Ross and Adam Hughes. The successful Lynda Carter TV show proved that the classic, iconic Wonder Woman costume from the 1940s to modern does translate just fine to live-action. There was no need for Jim Lee, David Kelley and Zack Snyder to radically redesign the costume and polarize and alienate fans.

Wonder Woman's American flag outfit is "outdated"? Retro style is in style, actually. Check out Katy Perry's outfits in recent years. In case anyone misunderstands, I'm not saying Wonder Woman should wear those exact same outfits Katy Perry has worn, I'm pointing out that it's not really out of style to wear an American flag outfit like Wonder Woman iconically wears.

Gal Gadot's costume is not modern, it's '90s Xena. Obviously I said I am not against Wonder Woman wearing body armor when needed for battle as long as the armor retains the iconic Wonder Woman essence of wearing the American flag, the Wonder Woman color scheme, etc. as the creators intended and as George Perez and Alex Ross retained, as I pointed out. So it's still Wonder Woman and not a bastardization. Obviously I am not against all change. There is a difference between updating the characters while retaining faithfulness to the icon rather than just trying to make the Wonder Woman character a dark bland carbon copy of Xena. It's unnecessary changes to an iconic suit that most agree was better before. No, I will not be supporting the Snyder Batman vs Superman movie with my money. I didn't support Snyder's Man of Steel, either. The Wonder Woman character was already updated for a contemporary audience while remaining true to the iconic costume in the Lynda Carter show, the comics by Perez and Hughes, without trying to reinvent it. It's not necessary to scrap some of the basics of the iconic Wonder Woman mythology, because the character really doesn't need it. As far as changing the costume goes, I subscribe to the old axiom...."If it ain't broke, don't fix it". I see no proof that the classic looks wouldn't work anymore. Lynda Carter's costumes were comic book accurate, both the 1940s one to the Golden Age and the contemporary one. The successful Lynda Carter TV show proved that the classic, iconic Wonder Woman costume does translate just fine to live-action. Instead of just reusing Lynda Carter's outfit, this subtly updated version retains the classic, iconic look. There is an inherent cheesiness to all superhero costumes. They either look cool or ridiculous to a person, generally depending if they are a superhero fan or not. A JLA director needs to be a fan and believe that they are cool, rather than try to make them "cool" and put them all in body armor or all in black costumes and give them all snarky, obnoxious or angsty attitudes in desperate attempts to make them cool, without realizing that they were cool as they were already. I want the classic, iconic characters brought to life faithfully, with their classic, iconic heroic characterizations and in their classic, iconic costumes that are known, recognized and loved by generations. These characters are legendary.

The failed David E. Kelley Wonder Woman TV show attempted to cover up Wonder Woman with pants, and there was an overwhelmingly negative reaction from the public. The majority of people don't want the iconic costumes altered to that extent. These characters are over-the-top, flashy, not subtle. Titillating cheesecake with Wonder Woman's bare legs and cleavage and beefcake with Hawkman and Martian Manhunter's bare chests actually helps attract male and female audiences. And I disagree with the notion that costumes retaining the classic, iconic looks wouldn't be liked and accepted by general audiences today. Straight guys wanting to cover Wonder Woman up in pants, etc. are embarrassed of their arousal, religion likely making them feel ashamed of "sin". As Phil Jimenez says, “The costume’s sexualized aspects, I think, make straight men uncomfortable. They see it, and they don’t want to explain to their kids the kinds of feelings it might bring out in them…which are probably the same feelings they’re having themselves. But I think gay men don’t have those feelings, and therefore they love the costume.” I'm a straight man but I don't view the female body as sinful or arousal as a sin. www.newsarama.com/21546-jim-mc…

Like the 1968-1973 white costume in the Wonder Woman: Diana Prince comics by Denny O'Neil and Mike Sekowsky, and the 1974 Cathy Lee Crosby Wonder Woman TV movie costume, these attempts to modernize Wonder Woman with modern fashion styles by replacing her iconic look, etc., with all-new makeover are always only temporary because, whether certain writers and artists and producers like it or not, the iconic look is Wonder Woman. And the iconic look is not outdated, it had in fact already been updated for contemporary times while still remaining Wonder Woman's iconic look consisting of star-spangled shorts, bare legs, yellow belt, red boots with a white streak, strapless red bustier with yellow emblem, yellow tiara with a red star, red pearl earrings, yellow magic lasso of truth, bullet proof bracelets, long black hair, curvaceous figure with flawless skin as beautiful as Aphrodite. And all the outfits bare her legs, in ancient Greece it was common and on Paradise Island, the culture Wonder Woman was raised in, it's common. Wonder Woman was intended by creator William Marston to be erotic, alluring.

John Byrne: "As I learned when I was working on her title, the Powers at DC have nothing but contempt for Wonder Woman. From the earliest days, when outside her own book she was assigned to a secretarial role in the JSA, she has always been pushed down. Even when DC decided to cash in on Women's Lib and turn Diana into a symbol of female emancipation, they did so by stripping her of her powers!" www.byrnerobotics.com/forum/fo…

During the early Post-Crisis comics, George Perez's long run (1986-1992) with editor Karen Berger was basically a restoration reboot, returned Wonder Woman to her mythological roots and her Amazon ideals from Paradise Island, trying to bring peace and love to man's world. Wonder Woman villains steeped in mythology are loaded with incredible potential, which they didn't have the budget, the CGI visual effects technology, to do in the Lynda Carter TV series in the '70s, since many of the creatures would have had to have been stop-motion animation at the time. Wonder Woman is based on Greek mythology. When you look through Greek mythology there's so many creatures, gods, locales that are exotic, strong visuals. Circe, the seven-headed dragon Hydra, the snake-like Echidna, Chimera - that's part lion, part bird, part goat, the Harpies - bird women, the dragon Ladon, the Gorgons, Phobos, Deimos, Ixion, Decay, Ares. I'd love to see Wonder Woman slay a dragon. Today they have the CGI technology, they could do this on a TV budget, especially on a major network. Some of the creatures, like Phobos, Deimos, Ares, could be done with actors in costumes and prosthetic make up like they did on the Star Trek shows, etc.

What made Wonder Woman a bastardization again was when both writer George Perez and editor Karen Berger left in 1992. William Messner-Loebs and editor Dan Thorsland and editor Brian Augustyn didn't respect the character (they had Wonder Woman working at a fast food job Taco Whiz, Diana in a black "biker-chick" outfit, Diana disenchanted with her Amazon ideals of peace and love, Diana interested in money and violence, Artemis as Wonder Woman) and they didn't respect the work Will Marston or George Perez had done and didn't respect the character. They even replaced the Perez Wonder Woman logo to a bland version.
Writer John Byrne and editor Paul Kupperberg returned Wonder Woman closer to the Will Marston roots by bringing back Diana as Wonder Woman in the costume, bringing back the invisible plane and bringing Wonder Woman back to the '40s Justice Society (except it was actually Wonder Woman's mother Queen Hippolyta as Wonder Woman in the '40s).
Wonder Woman was bastardized again when Joseph Michael Straczynski "JMS" did his Odyssey run.
Wonder Woman was bastardized again with Brian Azzarello's sexist reboot. Wonder Woman was rebooted as the demigoddess daughter of serial rapist Zeus. Diana's personality is a grim, humourless, macho-tough. The rebooted Amazons are sexual predators who seduce, fornicate and murder random innocent male sailors, and would have slaughtered their innocent male babies too but instead they sell their male babies to Hephaestus in exchange for weapons used to kill any men they meet. All the Amazons had been rebooted to be cruel and mistrustful even of Diana. It corrupts and destroys the notion of "Paradise Island" and completely vilifies the Amazon women as sinister wicked murderers. In ancient Greek mythology the Amazons were vilified as evil women with only one breast, attacking in heroic men. It was propaganda stories told by men in ancient times to keep women submissive, obedient and domesticated. In contrast, Marston's Wonder Woman's Amazon sisters lived on Paradise Island and were strong, heroic and peaceful, positive role models for girls and women, and alluring and appealing to boys and men. Wonder Woman was created for a specific moral purpose.

Wonder Woman creator Marston explained, "Wonder Woman-and the trend toward male acceptance of female love power which she represents indicates that the first psychological step has actually been taken. Boys, young and old, satisfy their wish thoughts by reading comics. If they go crazy over Wonder Woman, it means they're longing for a beautiful, exciting girl who's stronger than they are. By their comics tastes ye shall know them! Tell me anybody's preference in story strips and I'll tell you his subconscious desires. These simple, highly imaginative picture stories satisfy longings that ordinary daily life thwarts and denies. Superman and the army of male comics characters who resemble him satisfy the simple desire to be stronger and more powerful than anybody else. Wonder Woman satisfies the subconscious, elaborately disguised desire of males to be mastered by a woman who loves them." www.angelfire.com/indie/jamiet…

Adam Hughes was writing and drawing a comic book mini-series called All-Star Wonder Woman when Paul Levitz was still the big boss at DC. Until Warner Brothers boss Jeff Robinov had Diane Nelson, Dan DiDio and Jim Lee replaced Paul Levitz as President and Publisher of DC in 2009. Obviously Dan DiDio didn't care about All-Star Wonder Woman and didn't think All-Star Wonder Woman would be a huge seller and he thought Before Watchmen would be a huge seller. Adam Hughes’ wife Allison Sohn said, "They suggested Adam replace All-Star Wonder Woman in his exclusive contract with Before Watchmen."
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Paul Levitz was against allowing Before Watchmen and the New 52 reboot. Chris Roberson: "Paul Levitz was steadfastly against doing sequels or prequels to Watchmen since the late ’80s, and it wasn’t until he left his position that suddenly these plans were put into motion." www.tcj.com/i-have-not-yet-had…




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