NakamaCon: Mona Picture

Drawn by T-Bone, whom I lack informastion for. Sorry T-Bone.

This is a portrait of Mona, face only. And here I think it would be a good introduction for the rest of my commissions as well as a chance to explain her background.

If you are Islamic or otherwise care for accuracy in the mythology of the Middle East, you might want to turn away now. I change things big time for the sake of a modern day fantasy story. No disrespect is meant, but please bear in mind that my version of genies is not the same as the ideas on actual Middle Eastern Folklore of the djinn.

The tigress we know now as Mona once went by a different name and was a mortal being in a furry version of the 3rd century Middle East (let's call the place Persia for the sake of our tiny reference pools.)

The tigress was a harem girl who belong to the harem of a sultan who had little time for his women, but would occassionally lavish gifts upon them in his attempt to make up for rarely being there. One gift the tigress received was a ring that, unknown to anyone prior, had a genie inside of it.

Over time, she had to think her wishes over, and her first wish was to give the sultan more time for his harem. Unfortunately, the help he got to give him the time costed a lot of money, so the tigress' second wish was to make the kingdom financially prosperous so that the sultan would never lack for funding. However, the sultan soon grew bored of his money and time, and the tigress made her final wish for the sultan to be happy for the rest of his life. And indeed the sultan lived and eventually died a happy man,

After the funeral, the genie of the ring had returned to the tigress and offered to make her into a genie, for that was how new genies were made, by choosing a well-liked master and taking them into a separate world to teach them all the ways of magic. And such magic came with a few provisos, a couple of quid pro quos, you get the picture. And here they are, the rules that Mona follows (Yes. I am aware that they are not original):

1: Life is Sacred: Genie magic cannot kill. Though a genie could bring someone back to life, but such is a risky proposition. The revived is doomed to a living hell that would make Wile E. Coyote's life look like a walk in the park, simply because Death HATES being robbed.

2: Minds and Souls are sacred: A genie cannot affect a person's mind. Do you want that lesbian girl to suddenly turn straight for you? It can't be done (not unless you get really lucky and she likes you already in that exceptional way.) Do you want grandpa to no longer be a bigot? Sorry. He has to correct it himself. Genie magic just can't reshape mind and soul.

3: Genies are pretty close to immortal. They can take a lot of guff. However, the price is that if you destroy their container, that kills the genie.

Now comes the more original stuff. I cannot claim to have invented this stuff, but at least we can't trace all the following back to Disney's version of Alladin.

4: It's not a good idea to wish a genie free. Do that, and they become a mortal again. [An early draft idea was that this would kill the genie, but it seemed too harsh. So I went with it taking away all their powers.]

5: A genie could grant as many wishes as they please, but each successive wish for the same master has a greater and greater chance of coming out poorly. It's a negotiation thing with the Cosmic Whim. The Whim likes to put a price on this power, while the genie may want to make master happy. Because of this, genies usuallly contract for a set number of wishes [usually three] and restrict what constitutes a wish [pretty much to anything requiring phenominal cosmic power]. If you wish for a pizza, she'll just call Pizza Hut for a delivery and pay for it. That way, the Whim doesn't add the anchovies you don't want.
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