A Clash of Steel and Sand: Minotaur attack Picture

Even more World Building than before from this piece: [link] and this [link]. Here in the middle of the Crusades (preferably the Third).

Here in the year 1191, what was supposed to be a battle between the forces of Islam and Christianity, it instead became a battle of man vs monster, as the two forces were attacked by hungry Minotaurs, living relics from the Roman Empire. Hungry for the flesh of man, the minotaurs attacked the soldiers. Seeing the beasts both sides fled to the desert sands... until one Knight, dismounted and proceeded to try and stab the the Half-beast in the eye. The result was a beheading for the knight, but the death of one caused the many to try and avenge one of their fellow human beings. The next to die was a muslim swordsman, and soon a ferocious melee between man and monster rose from the desert sands.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________

This scene provides backstory to the overall universe of the Iron Colossus. It's practically our world, but with mythical creatures also living among us, causing various diverging points in several time periods of history. In this world, fighting mythical monsters takes greater priority than fighting human beings. The middle ages is a very focal part of the history of this world, because it is in the middle ages where regular people and soldiers began fighting back VERY hard, unlike the heroes of antiquity. This piece is also meant to be somewhat of a metaphor of how, when a percieved greater threat appears, Muslims and Christians in the Crusades allied with one another to take on a common foe (including the Templars and the Hashashin! They fought together against Saladin!).

Oh! One other good thing about having a mythological "real world", is that changed images and armor can be listed off as butterflies from a diverging point in history. Here, the Knight Hospitaller has a Maltese cross on his chest, something that didn't exist until much later. Ornaments are also given more practical purposes (the Teutonic Knight's horns for example) as a means to help frighten beasts in case an attack occurs.
Continue Reading: Minotaur