1980s-1990s Wonder Woman cast Picture

This is digital art I made of my idea of what a 1980s-1990s Wonder Woman movie cast could have been/should have been: US Army Intelligence Service/Air Force Pilot Captain, promoted to the rank of Major, and became Lieutenant Colonel, Steve Trevor (Robert Redford), Wonder Woman/Princess Diana/US Army Air Force nurse/intelligence officer Diana Prince (Lynda Carter), Etta Candy (Bette Midler), Wonder Woman's mother Queen Hippolyta (Cher), American Army Air Force General John Thomas Hillary (J.A. Preston), Dean for the Department of History and Geology at Harvard University Julia Kapatelis (Helen Mirren), teenage Vanessa Kapatelis (Mayim Bialik) and publicist Mindi Mayer (Carrie Fisher). Directed by Desmond Davis with stop motion by Ray Harryhausen.

Lynda Carter should have gotten Wonder Woman movies in the '80s and '90s when she still could have played her iconic role, and instead of a reboot it could have been a sequels to the TV series, although I think they should have have recasted Steve Trevor, Queen Hippolyta and of course Etta Candy.

As created by William Moulton Marston in the original Wonder Woman comic books of the 1940s, Wonder Woman originally had a secret identity as an American Army Nurse named Diana Prince. Wonder Woman represented the women who served as Army Nurses to fallen military men during World War II. She wanted to be close to Steve Trevor, and as a nurse healing the wounded, she is also actively spreading the Amazon ways of love and peace to the world of men.

In Wonder Woman: Spirit of Truth by Paul Dini and Alex Ross, Wonder Woman's secret identity as an Army Nurse was brought back and updated. She learns from Superman/Clark Kent that the best way to effect meaningful change is to work alongside people, rather than above them. As a Nurse she thinks to herself, "I tend to the innocent victims of man's cruelty. I will always be Wonder Woman when the need arises. Until then a new role awaits me. That of an ordinary woman who strives to do her best, armed with only a loving heart and a deep belief in the sometimes hidden, but always inherent, goodness of the people around her."

For a Wonder Woman film to be really faithful to her creator, the characters and the classic comics a Wonder Woman film should have the retro nurse uniform. Traditional nurse's uniforms were still worn in the '80s and have actually made a come back in some hospitals today. According to the results of a 2007 study at a large Midwestern health care center, patients and visitors perceived a nurse wearing a white uniform to be more professional than the same nurse wearing blue scrubs. With so many hospital employees dressed in scrubs, patients had no visual clues as to who was a nurse, and who was an aide, or an X-ray tech, or a member of the transport team. 71-year-old Jon Cole said of the white uniforms, "Takes me back to when I was a youngster, and reminds me of the '40s and '50s when they were wearing them." www.palmbeachpost.com/news/lif…

For a Wonder Woman film to be truly authentic and faithful to Wonder Woman it should be faithful to Wonder Wom
an creator William Moulton Marston's vision from the 1940s (with Diana's love for Steve Trevor, Diana as an Army nurse, Diana's friendship with Etta Candy) and George Perez's 1987 modernization with African American Army Air Force General John Thomas Hillary, Julia Kapatelis, Vanessa Kapatelis, Mindi Mayer, Ares, etc. A Wonder Woman movie should be a sword and sorcery fantasy adventure film, a military action movie and a romance. Wonder Woman should appeal to both a female and male audience.

A movie should be an iconic approach to the character. As Adam Hughes said when describing All-Star Wonder Woman, "This iconic approach to the character, and I’m looking at it the same way as the people who did…say, Batman: The Animated Series. You look over the sixty year history of the character, and treat it like a salad bar. You take the good bits, and leave the rest. You get the best of all possible worlds. Taking the best bits from the Golden Age, the best bits from the George Perez run, and hopefully will come up with something where I can say, 'Aha! A happy, healthy balance.'" archive.is/Wuih5#selection-861…

Air Force officer Lieutenant Etta Candy was created as Wonder Woman's fun loyal humorous bold, sassy, wisecracking friend providing some comic relief, she was made an Air Force Lieutenant by writer Gerry Conway in 1980, and she was also depicted with more intelligence by writer George Perez in 1986/1987, and Bette Midler could have brought all of that to life.

I realized that Cher has the same bone structure and hair as Queen Hippolyta in the classic comics, particularity the iconic George Perez art depiction. I have her sitting on this real throne from the 10th century Mezquita cathedral in Spain since it has the look of her throne in the comic and I used the 7th century Greek Temple of Athena as the Paradise Island background. She is holding a royal gold Sceptre. Her tiara crown is from the 11th century Kahuripan Kingdom Indonesia gold crown. Her bangs are from Claudette Colbert as Empress Poppaea in The Sign of the Cross (1932).

African American Army Air Force General John Thomas Hillary was created by Greg Potter and George Perez and first appeared in Wonder Woman #2 (1987) "A Fire in the Sky!" He should be brought to film adding a person of color from the comics to Wonder Woman's movie cast.

Julia Kapatelis and Vanessa Kapatelis give Wonder Woman a sense of family outside of Paradise Island. The Dean for the Department of History and Geology at Harvard University and understanding ancient Greek language, Julia Kapatelis teaches Wonder Woman English, and Vanessa Kapatelis is Julia's teenage daughter.

Mindi Mayer was a publicist with a tragically hidden drug addiction. Wonder Woman considers herself an Ambassador for Peace and Mindi Mayer is Wonder Woman's publicist to help Wonder Woman "spread the Amazon message of love and peace to the world of men."

Artist/writer George Perez explained, "I wanted to tap into Wonder Woman’s mythological background. I wanted to do a Ray Harryhausen story with Wonder Woman as the lead.
I’m still surprised, 20 years after the fact, that people tell me they like it." www.newsarama.com/21546-jim-mc…

In the book George Perez Storyteller by Christopher Lawrence, George Perez said, "Using my love for the Ray Harryhausen movies and my interest in mythology, I wanted to do a 'challenge of the gods' type thing. A particular type of story inspired by my love for Ray Harryhausen movies (Clash of the Titans, etc.), where the hero goes through a gauntlet of mythological adventures in order to reach a particular goal. It sold well. The best Wonder Woman sold in two decades. To this day, it's fondly remembered."

Artist/writer Adam Hughes said in 2006, "I happen to love the heavy mythological feel of the Perez issues. That presence was in the Golden Age William Moulton Marston version, and Perez just turned it up to 11. I’d like to keep that feel, because I like the tone of Wonder Woman as a mythological character, as opposed to just a straight superhero. I love George Perez's take on Wonder Woman. I love the whole aspect that her origins are tied to the Greco-Roman gods and I want to incorporate a lot of that into mine. She’s out somewhere, in strange new lands, meeting new people, and while she’s there, she needs to slay a dragon or something. I’m taking the best bits from the Golden Age, the best bits from the George Perez run, and hopefully will come up with something where I can say, ‘Aha! A happy, healthy balance.'" archive.today/Wuih5

As a Wonder Woman movie should be.
For a Wonder Woman film to be truly authentic and faithful to Wonder Woman it should be faithful to Wonder Woman creator William Moulton Marston's Golden Age vision and George Perez's modernization. A Wonder Woman movie should be a sword and sorcery monsters and magic fantasy adventure type film with Ares, etc. and a US Army Air Force military combat type film with Steve Trevor, etc. There's so much potential. Warner Brothers even owns the original Clash of the Titans (1981) and Warner Brothers released the remake in 2010. Director Desmond Davis was the director of the original Clash of the Titans (1981) that Ray Harryhausen did the stop motion.








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