Snake Head Picture

Close up of the wing("Snake Head")

The Atlas moth (Attacus atlas) is a large saturniid moth found in the tropical and subtropical forests of Southeast Asia, southern China, common across the Malay archipelago, Thailand to Indonesia.

Atlas moths are considered to be the largest moths in the world[3] in terms of total wing surface area (upwards of c. 400 square cm or 65 square inches). Their wingspans are also amongst the largest, from 25-30 cm (10-12 inches). Females are appreciably larger and heavier. (The largest lepidopteran in terms of wingspan is thought to be the White Witch Thysania agrippina. A record specimen of Attacus atlas from Java measured 262mm while Thysania are claimed to be about 270-280mm or 11 inches. Based on some spread specimens and angle of wing, actual measurements of around 289mm have been estimated.[4]) Atlas moths are said to be named after either the Titan of Greek mythology, or their map-like wing patterns. In Hong Kong the Cantonese name translates as "snake's head moth", referring to apical extension of the forewing, which bears a passing resemblance to a snake's head.

Atlas moths are predominantly tawny to maroon in colour with roughly triangular, diaphanous "eyes" on both forewing and hindwing, bordered in black. The purpose of these dramatic, gossamer portals is not clear, but they are thought to play a role in predator avoidance. Their bodies are hairy and disproportionately small compared to their wings. Patterns and colouration vary among the many described subspecies. Male Atlas moths are distinguished from females by their smaller size, more tapered wings, and larger, bushier antennae. Neither sex possess fully-formed mouthparts and therefore do not feed; they survive entirely on larval fat reserves throughout their 1-2 week adult life.
Vittorio Carvelli - Atlas
Turtle Atlas
Snake Head
Atlas - A hand to hold