Cyclops Picture

A cyclops (/ˈsklɒps/; Ancient Greek: Κύκλωψ, Kuklōps; plural cyclopes /sˈklpz/; Ancient Greek: Κύκλωπες, Kuklōpes), in Greek mythology and later Roman mythology, was a member of a primordial race of giants, each with a single eye in the middle of his forehead.[1] The name is widely thought to mean "round-eyed"[2] or "circle-eyed".[3]

Hesiod described three one-eyed Cyclopes, Brontes, Steropes and Arges the sons of Uranus and Gaia, brothers of the Titans, builders and craftsmen,[4] while the epic poet Homer described another group of mortal herdsmen Cyclopes. Homer does not tell if they are one-eyed, this is assumed when Odysseus spins a beam in Polyphemus' eye.[5] Other accounts were written by the playwright Euripides, poet Theocritus and Roman epic poet Virgil. In Hesiod's Theogony, Zeus releases three Cyclopes from the dark pit of Tartarus. They provide Zeus' thunderbolt, Hades' helmet of invisibility, and Poseidon's trident, and the gods use these weapons to defeat the Titans. In a famous episode of Homer's Odyssey, the hero Odysseus encounters the cyclops Polyphemus, the son of Poseidon and Thoosa (a nereid), who lives with his fellow Cyclopes in a distant country.

The First Beings...?