Talos Picture

Next in Mythos Bestiary, the bronze giant of Crete, Talos.
In Greek mythology, Talos (/ˈtɑːlɵs/; Greek: Τάλως, Talōs) or Talon (/ˈtɑːlɵn/; Greek: Τάλων, Talōn) was a giant man of bronze[1] who protected Europa in Crete from pirates and invaders by circling the island's shores three times daily[2] while guarding it.

Talos is said to be created from a petition from Hephaestus to Zeus, to protect Europa from persons who would want to kidnap her. In some versions of the myth, Talos is forged by the inventor Daedalus.

In the Cretan dialect, talôs was the equivalent of the Greek hêlios, the Sun: the lexicon of Hesychius of Alexandria notes simply "Talos is the Sun". In Crete Zeus was worshipped as Zeus Tallaios,[4] "Solar Zeus", absorbing the earlier god as an epithet in the familiar sequence.[5] The god was identified with the Tallaia, a spur of the Ida range in Crete. On the coin from Phaistos (illustration) he is winged; in Greek vase-paintings and Etruscan bronze mirrors he is not. The ideas of Talos vary widely, with one consistent detail: in Greek imagery outside Crete, Talos is always being vanquished:[6] he seems to have been an enigmatic figure to the Greeks themselves.[7]

Talos is described by Greeks as either a gift from Hephaestus to Minos, forged with the aid of the Cyclopes in the form of a bull[8] or a gift from Zeus to Europa.[9] Or he may have been the son of Kres, the personification of Crete;[10] In Argonautica Talos threw rocks at any approaching ship to protect his island.[11] In the Byzantine encyclopedia called the Suda, Talos is said, when the Sardinians did not wish to release him to Minos, to have heated himself – by jumping into a fire and to have clasped them in his embrace.[12]

Talos had one vein, which went from his neck to his ankle, bound shut by only one bronze nail. The Argo, transporting Jason and the Argonauts, approached Crete after obtaining the Golden Fleece. As guardian of the island, Talos kept the Argo at bay by hurling great boulders at it. According to the pseudo-Apollodorus' Bibliotheke, Talos was slain when Medea the sorceress either drove him mad with drugs, or deceived him into believing that she would make him immortal by removing the nail. In Argonautica, Medea hypnotized him from the Argo, driving him mad with the keres she raised, so that he dislodged the nail, and "the ichor ran out of him like molten lead", exsanguinating and killing him. Peter Green, translator of Argonautica, notes that the story is somewhat reminiscent of the story regarding the heel of Achilles.[13]
There ya go. I interpreted him as some big steam punk colossus. The "vein" that's his weakness is a tube that carries his power supply, coal, through his body. He gets the coal from consuming mass amounts of stone. He can later shoot the stones from the cannons on his palms. to the ancient Greeks this would look as if he was throwing boulders at them.

There it is. Next i'm doing something Filipino.
Lightning Mosaic
Pandoras box
Beautiful Monster
Sailor Europa