Clio Picture

In Greek mythology, Clio is the muse of history. Like all the muses, she is a daughter of Zeus and the Titaness Mnemosyne. Along with her sisters, she was considered to dwell either Mount Helicon or Mount Parnassos. Other common locations for the Muses were Pieria in Thessaly, near to Mount Olympus. She had one son, Hyacinth, with one of several kings, in various myths—with Pierus, King of Macedon, or with king Oebalus of Sparta, or with king Amyclas, progenitor of the people of Amyclae, dwellers about Sparta. Some sources say she was also the mother of Hymenaios. Other accounts credit her as the mother of Linus, a poet that was buried at Argos, but Linus has a number of differing parents depending upon the account, including several accounts where he is the son of Clio’s sisters Urania or Calliope.

Clio, sometimes referred to as “the Proclaimer”, is often represented with an open scroll of parchment scroll or a set of tablets. The name is etymologically derived from the Greek root κλέω/κλείω (meaning “to recount,” “to make famous,” or “to celebrate”).

(Connie Nielsen as Clio)


Daughters of Time: Inya
Tiamet
Clio
The golden fleece
Chaos the Guardian