Nyx Picture

The goddess Nyx was the personification of Night in Greek mythology. She played an important role in myth as one of the first divine beings to come into existence. Hesiod states that Night was the daughter of Chaos, which makes her one of the first creatures ever to emerge from the void.

To her was attributed power over illness, suffering, dreams, misfortunes, quarrels, war, murder, sleep and death. In fact, anything inexplicable or frightening that befell men was attributed to her. She was supposed to occupy a place in the lower world of the Greeks, together with Day. When this latter entered the palace, Nyx would ride out in a black chariot drawn by two dark steeds, and accompanied by many stars, she would traverse the heavens until daybreak, when she would return to the palace. She was depicted as a serious figure clad in long heavy drapery, on her head a black star-spangled veil. She sprouted black wings, and carried two children in her arms. One was black (Death), the other white (Sleep).

Nyx is not a goddess of chaos, but she is a balancer, for the energies of the universe cannot all become subsumed into the solid matter of Gaea (earth), nor can they be allowed to all be gathered to the center by Eros (sun). Matter is formed, and it must be unformed so that it returns to an energetic form, and then reform into matter again. Combining and recombining to form more and more complex materials. Stars that shine cannot do so forever, they must die and release their energies, their matter into the universe so that it continues.

The gods stirred, and they saw that what was made by that stirring was good, to borrow that bit from Genesis, and it is part of the role of Nyx to assure that it continues by destroying what is made, and that is the role of the dark aspect of the universe, the dark domain of Night.