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The Iliad of Homer

Page: 317

And now supine, now prone, the hero lay,
Now shifts his side, impatient for the day:
[pg 430]Illustration: <strong><a href=HECTOR'S BODY AT THE CAR OF ACHILLES." title= "HECTOR'S BODY AT THE CAR OF ACHILLES." />
HECTOR'S BODY AT THE CAR OF ACHILLES.

Illustration: THE JUDGMENT OF <strong><a href=PARIS." title= "THE JUDGMENT OF PARIS." />

THE JUDGMENT OF PARIS.
"If equal honours by the partial skies
Are doom'd both heroes, (Juno thus replies,)
If Thetis' son must no distinction know,
Then hear, ye gods! the patron of the bow.
But Hector only boasts a mortal claim,
His birth deriving from a mortal dame:
Achilles, of your own ethereal race,
Springs from a goddess by a man's embrace
(A goddess by ourself to Peleus given,
A man divine, and chosen friend of heaven)
[pg 432]
To grace those nuptials, from the bright abode
Yourselves were present; where this minstrel-god,
Well pleased to share the feast, amid the quire

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