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The Fall of Troy

Page: 64

  So fought they: nightlong, daylong fought they on,
  Ceteians, Trojans, battle-biding Greeks,
  Fought, now before the ships, and now again
  Round the steep wall, with fury unutterable.
  Yet even so for two days did they cease
  From murderous fight; for to Eurypylus came
  A Danaan embassage, saying, "From the war
  Forbear we, while we give unto the flames
  The battle-slain." So hearkened he to them:
  From ruin-wreaking strife forebore the hosts;
  And so their dead they buried, who in dust
  Had fallen. Chiefly the Achaeans mourned
  Peneleos; o'er the mighty dead they heaped
  A barrow broad and high, a sign for men
  Of days to be. But in a several place
  The multitude of heroes slain they laid,
  Mourning with stricken hearts. On one great pyre
  They burnt them all, and buried in one grave.
  So likewise far from thence the sons of Troy
  Buried their slain. Yet murderous Strife slept not,
  But roused again Eurypylus' dauntless might
  To meet the foe. He turned not from the ships,
  But there abode, and fanned the fury of war.

  Meanwhile the black ship on to Scyros ran;
  And those twain found before his palace-gate
  Achilles' son, now hurling dart and lance,
  Now in his chariot driving fleetfoot steeds.
  Glad were they to behold him practising
  The deeds of war, albeit his heart was sad
  For his slain sire, of whom had tidings come
  Ere this. With reverent eyes of awe they went
  To meet him, for that goodly form and face
  Seemed even as very Achilles unto them.
  But he, or ever they had spoken, cried:
  "All hail, ye strangers, unto this mine home
  Say whence ye are, and who, and what the need
  That hither brings you over barren seas."


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