<<<
>>>

The Fall of Troy

Page: 55

  Upfloated night, and darkened earth and air;
  Then feasted they before that cliff-like wall,
  Ceteian men and Trojans: babel of talk
  Rose from the feasters: all around the glow
  Of blazing campfires lighted up the tents:
  Pealed out the pipe's sweet voice, and hautboys rang
  With their clear-shrilling reeds; the witching strain
  Of lyres was rippling round. From far away
  The Argives gazed and marvelled, seeing the plain
  Aglare with many fires, and hearing notes
  Of flutes and lyres, neighing of chariot-steeds
  And pipes, the shepherd's and the banquet's joy.
  Therefore they bade their fellows each in turn
  Keep watch and ward about the tents till dawn,
  Lest those proud Trojans feasting by their walls
  Should fall on them, and set the ships aflame.

  Within the halls of Paris all this while
  With kings and princes Telephus' hero son
  Feasted; and Priam and the sons of Troy
  Each after each prayed him to play the man
  Against the Argives, and in bitter doom
  To lay them low; and blithe he promised all.
  So when they had supped, each hied him to his home;
  But there Eurypylus laid him down to rest
  Full nigh the feast-hall, in the stately bower
  Where Paris theretofore himself had slept
  With Helen world-renowned. A bower it was
  Most wondrous fair, the goodliest of them all.
  There lay he down; but otherwhere their rest
  Took they, till rose the bright-throned Queen of Morn.
  Up sprang with dawn the son of Telephus,
  And passed to the host with all those other kings
  In Troy abiding. Straightway did the folk
  All battle-eager don their warrior-gear,
  Burning to strike in forefront of the fight.
  And now Eurypylus clad his mighty limbs
  In armour that like levin-flashes gleamed;
  Upon his shield by cunning hands were wrought
  All the great labours of strong Hercules.


<<<
>>>