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Myths of Greece and Rome Narrated with Special Reference to Literature and Art

Page: 173

Lavinia was very beautiful, and had already had many suitors, among whom Turnus, a neighboring prince, boasted of the most exalted rank. The queen, Amata, specially favored this youth’s suit; and the king would gladly have received him for a son-in-law, [373] had he not twice been warned by the gods to reserve his daughter for a foreign prince, who had now appeared.

In spite of all the years which had elapsed since Paris scorned her attractions and bribes (p. 307), Juno had not yet forgotten her hatred of the Trojan race, and, afraid lest her enemy’s course should now prove too smooth, she sent Alecto, the Fury, down upon earth to stir up war, and goad Amata to madness. The Fury executed both commands, and Amata fled to the woods, where she concealed her daughter Lavinia, to keep her safe for Turnus, whom she preferred to Æneas.


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