<<<
>>>

Myths and Legends of the Great Plains

Page: 39

Then the Indian fled because they were ghosts. But they followed him. He looked back now and then, but he could not see them.

All at once he heard the cry of a woman. He was glad to have company. But the moment he thought about the woman, she appeared. She said, “I have come because you have just wished to have company.”

This frightened the man. The woman said, “Do not fear me; else you will never see me again.”

They journeyed until daybreak. The man looked at her. She seemed to have no legs, yet she walked without any effort. Then the man thought, “What if she should choke me.” Immediately the ghost vanished.


Black Coyote

Arapahoe chief, and a leader in the ghost-dance.

Courtesy of the Smithsonian Institution


Ornamentation on the Reverse of an Arapahoe “Ghost-dance” Shirt

Courtesy of the Smithsonian Institution


[Pg 122]

THE INDIAN WHO WRESTLED WITH A GHOST

Teton

A young man went alone on the warpath. At length he reached a wood. One day, as he was going along, he heard a voice. He said, “I shall have company.” As he was approaching a forest, he heard some one halloo. Behold, it was an owl.


<<<
>>>