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Myths and Legends of the Great Plains

Page: 30

FOOTNOTE:

Enlarged from plate in report of the Bureau of Ethnology


An unrolled bed, with decorative edges and loop at the top. An Arapahoe Bed

Courtesy of the Smithsonian Institution


[Pg 97]

SONG OF THE PRAIRIE BREEZE[L]

Kiowa

That wind, that wind
Shakes my tipi, shakes my tipi,
And sings a song for me,
And sings a song for me.

“To the familiar, this little song brings up pleasant memories of the prairie camp when the wind is whistling through the tipi poles and blowing the flaps about, while inside the fire burns bright and the song and the game go round.”

FOOTNOTE:

[L] James Mooney.


[Pg 98]

OLD-WOMAN-WHO-NEVER-DIES

Mandan

In the sun lives the Lord of Life. In the moon lives Old-Woman-Who-Never-Dies. She has six children, three sons and three daughters. These live in the sky. The eldest son is the Day; another is the Sun; another is Night. The eldest daughter is the Morning Star, called “The Woman who Wears a Plume”; another is a star which circles around the polar star, and she is called “The Striped Gourd”; the third is Evening Star.


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