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Myths and Legends of the Celtic Race

Page: 221

overtaken but spared by Cuchulain, 225;
makes seven years' peace with Ulster, 225;
vengeance of, against Cuchulain, 233;
mac Datho's hound and, 244;
retires to island on Loch Ryve, 245;
slain by Forbay, 245
Maga. Daughter of Angus Ōg, wife of Ross the Red, 181;
wedded also to Druid Cathbad, 181
[pg 447]
Magi. Word magic derived from, 60;
treated by Pliny, 61
Magic. The religion of Megalithic People that of, 59;
origin of word, 60;
Pliny on, 61;
religion of, invented in Persia and by Zoroaster, 61;
traces of, in Megalithic monuments, 63;
Clan Calatin learn, in Ireland, Alba, and Babylon, to practise against Cuchulain, 233
Maitre, M. Albert. Inspector of Musée des Antiquités Nationales, 64
Malory. Anticipated by Wace, 339;
Cymric myths and, 388
Man´anan. Son of the Sea-god, Lir, 139;
magical Boat of, brought by Lugh, with Horse of, and sword Fragarach, from the Land of the Living, 121;
attributes of Sea-god mostly conferred on, 125;
the most popular deity in Irish mythology, 125;
lord of sea beyond which Land of Youth or Islands of the Dead were supposed to lie, 125;
master of tricks and illusions, owned magical possessions—boat, Ocean-Sweeper; steed, Aonbarr; sword, The Answerer, &c. &c., 125;
reference to daughter of, given to Angus, a Danaan prince, 143;
his wife, Fand, sets her love on Cuchulain, 226;
Fand recovered by, 227;
shakes his cloak between Fand and Cuchulain, 228;
Cymric deity Manawyddan corresponds with, 348
Manawyddan (mana-wudh'en). In Welsh mythology, son of Llyr;
Irish equivalents, Mananan and Lir, 347;
Bendigeid Vran (“Bran the Blessed”), his brother, 365;
the tale of Pryderi and, 378;
weds Rhiannon, 373
Mané-er-h´oeck. Remarkable tumulus in Brittany, 64
Manés. Seven outlawed sons of Ailell and Maev, 169;
their rally to Maev's foray against Ulster, 204
Manessier. A continuator of Chrestien de Troyes, 408
Man´etho. Egyptian historian, reference to human sacrifices, 86
Manred. The ineffable Name of God pronounced, and so was formed, 333;
the primal substance of the universe, 333
Maon (may'un). Son of Ailill;
brutal treatment of, by Covac, 154;
has revenge on Ailill by slaying him and all his nobles, 153;
weds Moriath, and reigns over Ireland, 154;
equivalent, “Labra the Mariner,” 154
Marcellin´us, Ammian´us. Gauls described by, 42
Marie de France. Anglo-Norman poetess;
sources relating to the Arthurian saga in writings of, 340
Māth son of Māthonwy. Title of tale in the “Mabinogion,” 347;
Llew Llaw Gyffes, a character in tale of, 348;
brother of Penardun, 349;
the tale of, 384;
Gwydion and Gilvaethwy, nephews of, 378;
his strange gift of hearing, 386
Matholwch (math'o-law). King of Ireland;
comes seeking Branwen's hand in marriage, 366;
wedding of, and Branwen's, celebrated at Aberffraw, 366;
Evnissyen mutilates his horses, 367;
Bran, among other gifts, gives a magic cauldron to, 368;
father of Gwern, 368;
informed of Bran's invasion, 369;
hands sovranty of Ireland to Gwern, 370
Māthonwy. Ancestor of House of Dōn, 349
Matière de France. Source of Round Table and chivalric institutions ascribed to Arthur's court, 341
Maxen Wledig (oo'le-dig). Emperor of Rome;
the dream of, 385
[pg 448]
May-Day. Sacred to Beltené, day on which Sons of Miled began conquest of Ireland, 134;
combat every, between Gwythur ap Greidawl and Gwyn ap Nudd, 353;
strange scream heard in Britain on eve of, 385
Meath. Fergus in his battle-fury strikes off the tops of the three Maela of, 224;
St. Patrick and the folk of, 282
Medicine. See 61;
Pliny and, 61
Megalithic People. Builders of dolmens, cromlechs, &c., 93;
origin of the, 58;
Professor Ridgeway's contention about, 56;
their religion that of magic, 59;
representations of the divine powers under human aspect unknown to, 75;
Druidism imposed on the Celts by the, 82;
human sacrifices, practice a survival from the, 84;
conception of, regarding their deities, 86
Mercury. Regarded as chief of the gods by Gauls, 87;
Lugh Lamfada identified with, 113
Merlin. See Myrddin.
Reference to his magical arts, 337;
equivalent Myrddin, 354;
believed by Geoffrey of Monmouth to have erected Stonehenge, 354;
the abode of, described, 356
Mesged´ra. The vengeance of, fulfilled, 241
Mesro´da, mac Datho. Son of Datho, 241;
the carving of the boar of, 244;
Conor and Maev both send to purchase his hound, 241
Messbuachalla (mess-boo'hala). Only daughter of Etain Oig, 166;
significance, “the cowherd's foster-child,” 166;
King Eterskel's promised son and, 166;
visited by a Danaan lover, and birth of Conary, 167
Mexico. Cup-and-ring marking in, 68;
symbol of the feet found in, 77;
the cross-legged “Buddha,” frequent occurrence in religious art of, 87
Midir the Proud (mid'eer). A son of the Dagda;
a type of splendour, 124;
his appearance to King Eochy, 124;
Fuamnach, wife of, 156;
Etain, second bride of, 156;
recovers his wife from Eochy, 163;
yields up Etain, 163
Miled.
1. Sons of;
conquer the People of Dana, 100;
the coming of, to displace rule in Ireland of Danaans, 130;
Bregon, son of, 130;
Amergin, son of, 133;
begin conquest of Ireland on May-day, 134.
2. A god, represented as, in a Celtic inscription from Hungary, son of Bilé, 130.
3. Children of;
resolve to take vengeance for Ith's slaying, 133;
enter upon the sovranty of Ireland, 136
Milesian-s. See 130;
myth, meaning of, 145;
the early kings, 148
Minorca. Analogous structures (to represent ships) to those in Ireland found in, 76
Mochaen (mo-chayn'). Hill of, and Lugh's eric, 115
Modred. King Arthur's nephew;
usurps his uncle's crown and weds his wife Guanhumara, 337;
Arthur defeats and slays, 338
Mongan. Irish chieftain, reincarnation of Finn;
wager as to place of death of King Fothad, 81
Montel´ius, Dr. Oscar. And the ship symbol, 72
Moonre´mur. A lord of Ulster;
mac Datho's boar and, 243
Morann. Druid;
prophecy of, concerning Cuchulain, 183
Morc. Fomorian king, 101
Morda. A blind man, set by Ceridwen to keep fire under the magic cauldron, 413
Mor´iath. Daughter of Scoriath, the King of Feramore;
her love for Maon and her device [pg 449] to win him back to Ireland, 154;
curious tale regarding his hair, 154
Morna. Father of Goll, 257
Morr´igan, The. Extraordinary goddess, embodying all that is perverse and horrible among supernatural powers, 126;
her love and friendship for Cuchulain, 126;
her visit to Conary Mōr at Hostel of Da Derga, 172;
appears to Cuchulain and offers her love, 212;
her threat to be about his feet in bottom of the Ford, 212;
attacks Cuchulain, and is wounded by him, 213;
croaks of war and slaughter before Cuchulain, 230;
settles on the dead Cuchulain's shoulder as a crow, 233
Mountains of Mourne. Cuchulain on, 193
Moyrath. Battle of, ended resistance of Celtic chiefs to Christianity, 51
Moyslaught (“The Plain of Adoration”).

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