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Myths and Legends of the Celtic Race

Page: 204

Greek type of civilisation preserved by, 22;
art of enamelling originated in, 30;
the Druids formed the sovran power in, 46;
Brigit (Dana) most widely worshipped goddess in, 126
Celts. Term first found in Hecatæus;
equivalent, Hyperboreans, 17;
Herodotus and dwelling-place of, 17;
Aristotle and, 17;
Hellanicus of Lesbos and, 17;
Ephorus and, 17;
Plato and, 17;
their attack on Rome, a landmark of ancient history, 18;
described by Dr. T. Rice Holmes, 19;
dominion of, over Mid-Europe, Gaul, Spain, and the British Isles, 20;
their place among these races, 20;
Giraldus Cambrensis and, 21;
Spain conquered from the Carthaginians by, 21;
Northern Italy conquered from the Etruscans by, 21;
Vergil and, 21;
conquer the Illyrians, 21;
alliance with the Greeks, 22;
conquests of, in valleys of Danube and Po, 23;
Alexander makes compact with, 23;
national oath of, 24;
welded into unity by Ambicatus, 25;
defeat Romans, 26;
Germanic peoples and, 33;
decorative motives derived from Greek art, 29;
art of enamelling learnt by classical nations from, 30;
burial rites practised by, 33;
character, elements comprising, 36;
Strabo's description of, 39;
love of splendour and methods of warfare, 40;
Polybius' description of warriors in battle of Clastidium, 41;
their influence on European literature and philosophy, 50;
the Religion of the, 93;
ranges of the Balkans and Carpathians earliest home of mountain, 57;
musical services of, described by Hecatæus, [pg 428] 58;
Switzerland, Burgundy, the Palatinate, Northern France, parts of Britain, &c., occupied by mountain, 58;
origin of doctrine of immortality, 75;
idea of immortality and doctrine of transmigration, 81;
the present-day, 92;
no non-Christian conception of origin of things, 94;
victories at the Alba and at Delphi attributed to Brenos (Brian), 126;
true worship of, paid to elemental forces represented by actual natural phenomena, 147
Cenchos.
Otherwise The Footless;
related to Vitra, the God of Evil in Vedantic mythology, 97
Cer´idwen.
Wife of Tegid, 413;
sets Gwion Bach and Morda to attend to the magic cauldron, 413
Ceugant (Infinity).
The outermost of three concentric circles representing the totality of being in the Cymric cosmogony, inhabited by God alone, 334
Chaillu, Du.
His “Viking Age,” 72
Champion of Ireland.
Test at feast of Briccriu, to decide who is the, 196;
Cuchulain proclaimed such by demon The Terrible, 196
Charlemagne.
Tree- and stone-worship denounced by, 66
Children of Lir.
Reference to, 121
Chrestien de Troyes.
French poet, influential in bringing the Arthurian saga into the poetic literature of Europe, 341;
Gautier de Denain the earliest continuator of, 341;
variation of his “Le Chevalier au lion” seen in “The Lady of the Fountain,” 399;
the “Tale of Enid and Geraint” based on “Erec” of, 399;
Peredur corresponds to the Perceval of, 400;
his “Conte del Graal,” or “Perceval le Gallois,” 303;
Manessier a continuator of, 408
Christian.
Symbolism, the hand as emblem of power in, 65;
faith, heard of by King Cormac ere preached in Ireland by St. Patrick, 69;
influences in Ireland, and the Milesian myth, 138;
ideas, gathered around Cuchulain and his lord King Conor of Ulster, 240;
pagan ideals contrasted with, in Oisīn dialogues, 288;
Myrddin dwindles under influences, 354
Christianity.
Reference to conversion of Ireland to, 83;
People of Dana in their overthrow, and attitude of, 138;
Cuchulain summoned from Hell by St. Patrick to prove truths of, to High King Laery, 239;
effect of on Irish literature, 296
Chry´sostom, Dion.

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