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Myths and Legends of the Celtic Race

Page: 203

Ble´heris.
A Welsh poet identical with Bledhericus, mentioned by Giraldus Cambrensis, and with Bréris, quoted by Thomas of Brittany, 342
Blerwm, Blerwm (bleroom).
Sound made by Taliesin by which a spell was put on bards at Arthur's court, 416
Blodeuwedd, or Flower-Face.
The flower-wife of Llew, 383
Boanna (the river Boyne).
Mother of Angus Ōg, 121
Book of Armagh.
References to, 147
Book of Caermarthen, Black.
Gwyn ap Nudd figures in poem included in, 353
Book of the Dun Cow.
Reference to, 97;
Cuchulain makes his reappearance legend of Christian origin in, 238;
“Voyage of Maeldūn” is found in, 309
Book of Hergest, The Red.
Forms main source of tales in the “Mabinogion,” 344;
the story of Taliesin not found in, 412
Book of Invasions.
Reference to, 106
Book of Leinster.
References to, 208
Bōv the Red.
King of the Danaans of Munster, brother of the Dagda;
searches for maiden of Angus Ōg's dream, 123;
goldsmith of, named Len, 123;
Aoife's journey to, with her step-children, 140
Boyne, The River.
Angus Ōg's palace at, 121;
Angus and Caer at, 122;
Milesians land in estuary of, 136;
Ethné loses her veil of invisibility while bathing in river, 144;
church, Kill Ethné, on banks of, 145
Bran.
See Bendigeid
Branwen.
Sister of Bran, 366;
given in marriage to Matholwch, 366;
mother of Gwern, 368;
degraded because of Evnissyen's outrage, 369;
brought to Britain, 372;
her death and burial on the banks of the Alaw, 372
Brea (bray).
Battle of, reference to Finn's death at, 275
Bregia.
Locality of, 168;
the plains of, viewed by Cuchulain, 193;
St. Patrick and folk of, 282
Breg´on.
Son of Miled, father of Ith, 130;
tower of, perceived by Ith, 132
Brenos (Brian).
Under this form, was the god to whom the Celts attributed their victories at the Allia and at Delphi, 126
Bres.
1. Ambassador sent to Firbolgs, by People of Dana, 106;
slain in battle of Moytura, 107.
2. Son of Danaan woman named Eri, chosen as King of Danaan territory in Ireland, 107;
his ill-government and deposition, 108.
3. Son of Balor;
learns that the appearance of the sun is the face of Lugh of the Long Arm, 123
Bri Leith (bree lay).
Fairy palace of Midir the Proud at, in Co. Longford, 124;
Etain carried to, 163
Brian.
One of three sons of Turenn, 114
Brian.
Equivalent, Brenos.
Son of Brigit (Dana), 126
Briccriu of the Poisoned Tongue (bric'roo).
Ulster lord;
causes strife between Cuchulain and Red Branch heroes as to Championship of Ireland, 195;
summons aid of demon named The Terrible, 196;
his suggestion for carving mac Datho's boar, 243
Bridge of the Leaps.
Cuchulain at, 187;
Cuchulain leaps, 188
Brigindo.
Equivalents, Brigit and “Brigantia,” 103
Brigit (g as in “get”).
Irish goddess identical with Dana [pg 426] and “Brigindo,” &c., 126;
daughter of the god Dagda, “The Good,” 126;
Ecne, grandson of, 103
Britain.
See Great Britain.
Carthaginian trade with, broken down by the Greeks, 22;
place-names of, Celtic element in, 27;
under yoke of Rome, 35;
magic indigenous in, 62;
votive inscriptions to Æsus, Teutates, and Taranus found in, 86;
dead carried from Gaul to, 131;
Ingcel, son of King of, 169;
visit of Demetrius to, 355;
Bran, King of, 365;
Caradawc rules over in his father's name, 369;
Caswallan conquers, 372;
the “Third Fatal Disclosure” in, 373
Britan.
Nedimean chief who settled in Great Britain and gave name to that country, 102
British Isles.
Sole relics of Celtic empire, on its downfall, 34;
Maev, Grania, Findabair, Deirdre, and Boadicea, women who figure in myths of, 43
Britons.
Geoffrey of Monmouth, like Nennius, affords a fantastic origin for the, 338
Brittany.
Mané-er-H´oeck, remarkable tumulus in, 63;
tumulus of Locmariaker in, markings on similar to those on tumulus at New Grange, Ireland, 72;
symbol of the feet found in, 77;
book brought from, by Walter, Archdeacon of Oxford, formed basis of Geoffrey of Monmouth's “Historia Regum Britaniæ,” 337;
Arthurian saga in, 340
Brogan.
St. Patrick's scribe, 290
Brown Bull.
See Quelgny
Brugh na Boyna (broo-na-boyna).
Pointed out to Cuchulain, 193
Buddha.
Footprint of, found in India as symbol, 77;
the cross-legged, frequent occurrence in religious art of the East and Mexico, 87
Buic (boo´ik).
Son of Banblai;
slain by Cuchulain, 211
Burney's History of Music.
Reference to Egyptian legend in, 118
Bury, Professor.
Remarks of, regarding the Celtic world, 59
C
Caer.
Daughter of Ethal Anubal;
wooed by Angus Ōg, 123;
her dual life, 122;
accepts the love of Angus Ōg, 122
Caerleon-on-Usk.
Arthur's court held at, 337
Cæsar, Julius.
Critical account of Gauls, 37;
religious beliefs of Celts recorded by, 52;
the Belgæ, the Celtæ, and the Aquitani located by, 58;
affirmation that doctrine of immortality fostered by Druids to promote courage, 82;
culture superintended by Druids, recorded by, 84;
gods of Aryan Celts equated with Mercury, Apollo, &c., by, 86
Cair´bry.
Son of Cormac mac Art, father of Light of Beauty, 304;
refuses tribute to the Fianna, 305;
Clan Bascna makes war upon, 308
Caliburn (Welsh Caladvwlch).
Magic sword of King Arthur, 338.
See 224, note
Cambren´sis, Giral´dus.
Celts and, 21
Campbell.
Version of battle of Gowra, in his “The Fians,” 307
Car´adawc.
Son of Bran;
rules Britain in his father's absence, 369
Carell.
Reputed father of Tuan, 100
Carpathians.
Earliest home of mountain Celts was ranges of the, 57
Carthaginians.
Celts conquered [pg 427] Spain from, 21;
Greeks break monopoly of trade of, with Britain and Spain, 22
Cas´corach. Son of a minstrel of the Danaan Folk;
and St. Patrick, 119
Castle of Wonders. Peredur at, 406
Cas´wallan. Son of Beli;
conquers Britain during Bran's absence, 372
Cathbad. Druid;
wedded to Maga, wife of Ross the Red, 181;
his spell of divination overheard by Cuchulain, 185;
draws Deirdre's horoscope, 197;
casts evil spells over Naisi and Deirdre, 200
Catholic Church. Mediæal interdicts of, 46
Cato, M. Porcius. Observances of, regarding Gauls, 37
Cauldron of Abundance. See equivalent, Stone of Abundance;
also see Grail
Celtæ One of three peoples inhabiting Gaul when Cæar's conquest began, 58
Celtchar (kelt-yar). Son of Hornskin;
under debility curse, 205
Celtdom. The Golden Age of, in Continental Europe, 21
Celtic. Power, diffusion of, in Mid-Europe, 26;
placenames in Europe, 27;
artwork relics, story told by, 28;
Germanic words, Celtic element in, 32;
empire, downfall of, 34;
weak policy of peoples, 44;
religion, the, 47;
High Kings, traditional burial-places of, 69;
doctrine of immortality, origin of so-called “Celtic,” 76;
ideas of immortality, 87;
deities, names and attributes of, 88;
conception of death, the, 89;
culture, five factors in ancient, 90;
the present-day populations, 92;
cosmogony, the, 95;
things, “Barddas” a work not unworthy the student of, 333
Celtica. Never inhabited by a single pure and homogeneous race, 18;

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