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Myths and Legends of China

Page: 205

Ts’ai Shên. God of Wealth, 171; Chao Kung-ming prototype of, 171; legend of, 171; canonized, 171

Ts’ai-yün Hsien-tzŭ. Fights for Wên Chung, 160

Ts’an Nü. Also called Ma-t’ou Niang; Goddess of Mulberry-trees and Silkworms, 169; legend of, 169; also represented as a stellar divinity, 169

Ts’ao Ching-chih. In legend of Ts’ao Kuo-chiu, 302

Ts’ao Ching-hsiu. Becomes the Immortal Ts’ao Kuo-chiu, 301 sq.

Tsao Chün. The Kitchen-god, 166 sq.; reports to Supreme Being, 168; chief of Yüan-shih T’ien-tsun’s secret police, 128; origin of worship of, 167; Li Shao-chün and, 167

Ts’ao Kuo-chiu. One of the Eight Immortals, 303; legend of, 300 sq.

Ts’ao Ts’ao. Usurping general in period of the Three Kingdoms; and Kuan Yü, 116

Tso Ch’ih. See Chisel-tooth

Tso-ch’iu Ming. Author of the Tso chuan, commentary on the Annals of Confucius; and Chinese mythology, 72

T’u Hsing-sun. Magician; and Têng Chiu-kung, 147; marries Ch’an-yü, 147

Tu Ô. Taoist magician; teaches the Snorter, 145

T’u-ti. Local gods, 165; report murder of the Tais to Yü Huang, 256; sent to help Miao Shan in the Nunnery of the White Bird, 263; report the approaching execution of Miao Shan to Yü Huang, 266; carry Miao Shan to P’u T’o Island, 270; find companions for Miao Shan, 271; help Miao Shan, 272

Tung Wang Kung, Mu Kung, or Tung-hua Ti-chün. God of the Immortals; and Shên I, 185 sq.; and the Spirit of Lightning, 203. See Mu Kung

Tung-hua Ti-chün. See Tung Wang Kung

T’ung-t’ien Chiao-chu. First of the Patriarchs of the Taoists, 133; and Hung-chün Lao-tsu, 133; battle with Chun T’i, 134; the buffalo of, 134; given pill of immortality and taken to Heaven, 134; and the twenty-eight constellations, 192; and Chun T’i, 321 sq.

Turkestan, Eastern. Supposed origin of the Chinese in, 13. See also Sinkiang

Tzŭ T’ung. Chang Ya at, 104; the God of, 105; Wên Ch’ang and the Spirit of, 109

Tz’ŭ-hang Ta-shih. Immortal, 216

Tzŭ-hua. In legend of Ch’un-yü Fên, 419

Tzŭ-wei Hsing. Constellation. See Po I-k’ao

U

Umbrellas, The Magic, 242

Unicorn. K’uei niu 133

Unicorn Precipice, The, 155

Unity, The Great. First of the celestial spirits, 143

Unnatural People, 386 sq.

V

Vairotchana. Dharma, the highest of the Three Embodiments (Triratna), representing Purity; Chinese P’i-lu Fo, 120 Page 452

Vajrâpani. God of Thunder. See Lei Kung

Vega. Star; legend of Aquila and, 189 sq.

Vihârapâla. See Wei-t’o

W

Wang Ch’ang. Disciple of Chang Tao-ling, 216

Wang Chê. Brigand chief; begs of Shih family, 255; murders Tai family, 255

Wang Tan. A minister of State; and the cask of pearls, 132; K’ang Hsi on, 132

War, God of, 113 sq.

Waters. Shên I marries sister of the Water-spirit, 182; myths of the, 208 sq.; dragons are spirits of the, 208; Ministry of the, 212; Yang Hou, Spirit of the Sea, 212 sq.; Shui Kuan, Ruler of the Watery Elements, 216; Shui-mu Niang-niang, Old Mother of the, 220 sq. See also Ho Po and Shui

Watters, Thomas. Consul-General; on fox-lore, 370

Way. See Tao

Wealth, God of. See Ts’ai Shên

Weapons, 33

Weaver-girl, The Herdsman and the. Legend of, 189 sq.

Wei Chêng. Associated with Door-gods. See Mên Shên

Wei-t’o. Vihârapâla; the Dêva protector of Buddhist temples and of the Law of Buddha, 120

Weights and Measures, 49

Well, Spirits of the, 217

Wên Ch’ang. God of Literature; attendants on, 110; legends of, 104 sq.; and the Great Bear, 105 sq.; palace of, 106

Wên Chiao. Wife of Ch’ên Kuang-jui, and mother of Hsüan Chuang, 337 sq.

Wên Chung. Famous generalissimo, canonized as God of Thunder; his battle with Chiang Tzŭ-ya, 158 sq.; attacked by Huang T’ien-hua, 159; wounded by Chiang Tzŭ-ya, 160; forced to retreat, 161; fights more battles, 161; drawn up to Heaven, 161; another account of his battles and death, 199. See also Lei Tsu

Wên Wang. Father of Po I-k’ao; prisoner of Chou Hsin, 192; Ta Chi and, 193; Lei Chên-tzŭ and, 203

Wên Yü. See Lei Chên-tzŭ

Wên-chu T’ien-tsun. Fights with No-cha, 318

Western Air, Sovereign of the, 137

White Bird Nunnery. Miao Shan goes to, 261 sq.; set on fire, 264; saved by Miao Shan, 264

White Crane Youth. Captures Shên Kung-pao’s head, 156; restores the head, 157; kills Ch’iung Hsiao, 158; fights and defeats Chang Shao, 159

White Elephant. In Kuan Yin legend, 286

White Horse. Of Hsŭan Chuang, 341

White Tiger. Po Hu; spirit of the White Tiger Star; guardian of Taoist temple gates, 148

Wife. Status of, 24; legend of the Expectant, 392

Wild Men. Legend of, 393

Wind, Spirit of the. Fei Lien; vanquished by Shên I, 205; myths of the, 205. See also Fêng Po

Women, The Lovely. In the Hsi yu chi, 362 sq.

Women’s Kingdom. Legend of the, 391

Worship. Origin of, 93; of Shang Ti, 95; of T’ien, 96; of the living, 101; the second self and, 101; of the Kitchen-god, 167; of the harvest moon, 176; of the sun, 179; of Chang Hsien, 178; of constellations, 191; of T’ai Sui, 197; of Wu Yüeh, 242; origin of dog-worship of Jung tribe, 422

Wu. Exorcists, 34

Wu Hsing. The Five Elements, 84

Wu San-kuei. General of Emperor Ch’ung Chêng, 399

Wu Ti. See Kuan Ti Page 453

Wu Ti Tso. ‘Throne of the Five Emperors’; in the constellation Leo, 176

Wu Wang. First king of the Chou dynasty; his battles with Chou Wang, 134; and Chiang Tzŭ-ya, 154; killed and revived, 159

Wu Yüeh. ‘Five Mountains’; gods worshipped in cases of fever, etc., 243; legend of, 243 sq.

Wu Yün. Immortal; and Chun Ti, 324

Y

Yang. The male principle in nature, 93; its hold on the Chinese mind, 92; Mu Kung and, 137; united with yin in marriage, 186; conjunction of yin and, 188; and lightning, 203. See also Yin

Yang Ch’êng. See Fu Shên

Yang Chien. Nephew of Yü Huang; and Hua-hu Tiao, 123; and Ch’an-yü, 147; battles with Ch’ien-li Yen and Shun-fêng Êrh, 162 sq.; and Lü Yüeh, 242

Yang Hou. Spirit of the Sea, 212 sq.

Yang Hsi-chi. See Fu Shên

Yang Jên. Magician; and Lü Yüeh, 242

Yao. 1. Early emperor; with Shun and Yü as the Three Origins, 127; and Shên I, 180 sq.,


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