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Hesiod, The Homeric Hymns, and Homerica

Page: 77

Fragment #4—2102 Athenaeus, ii. p. 40: 'For pleasant it is at a feast and rich banquet to tell delightful tales, when men have had enough of feasting;...'

Clement of Alexandria, Stromateis vi. 2 26: '...and pleasant also it is to know a clear token of ill or good amid all the signs that the deathless ones have given to mortal men.'

Fragment #5—Athenaeus, xi. 498. A: 'And Mares, swift messenger, came to him through the house and brought a silver goblet which he had filled, and gave it to the lord.'

Fragment #6—Athenaeus, xi. 498. B: 'And then Mantes took in his hands the ox's halter and Iphiclus lashed him upon the back. And behind him, with a cup in one hand and a raised sceptre in the other, walked Phylacus and spake amongst the bondmen.'

Fragment #7—Athenaeus, xiii. p. 609 e: Hesiod in the third book of the "Melampodia" called Chalcis in Euboea 'the land of fair women'.

Fragment #8—Strabo, xiv. p. 676: But Hesiod says that Amphilochus was killed by Apollo at Soli.

Fragment #9—Clement of Alexandria, Stromateis, v. p. 259: 'And now there is no seer among mortal men such as would know the mind of Zeus who holds the aegis.'


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