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Hesiod, The Homeric Hymns, and Homerica

Page: 57

Fragment #15—Strabo 1714, i. p. 42: 'And the daughter of Arabus, whom worthy Hermaon begat with Thronia, daughter of the lord Belus.'

Fragment #16—Eustathius, Hom. 461. 2: 'Argos which was waterless Danaus made well-watered.'

Fragment #17—Hecataeus 1715 in Scholiast on Euripides, Orestes, 872: Aegyptus himself did not go to Argos, but sent his sons, fifty in number, as Hesiod represented.

Fragment #18—1716 Strabo, viii. p. 370: And Apollodorus says that Hesiod already knew that the whole people were called both Hellenes and Panhellenes, as when he says of the daughters of Proetus that the Panhellenes sought them in marriage.

Apollodorus, ii. 2.1.4: Acrisius was king of Argos and Proetus of Tiryns. And Acrisius had by Eurydice the daughter of Lacedemon, Danae; and Proetus by Stheneboea 'Lysippe and Iphinoe and Iphianassa'. And these fell mad, as Hesiod states, because they would not receive the rites of Dionysus.

Probus 1717 on Vergil, Eclogue vi. 48: These (the daughters of Proetus), because they had scorned the divinity of Juno, were overcome with madness, such that they believed they had been turned into cows, and left Argos their own country. Afterwards they were cured by Melampus, the son of Amythaon.

Suidas, s.v.: 1718 'Because of their hideous wantonness they lost their tender beauty....'

Eustathius, Hom. 1746.7: '....For he shed upon their heads a fearful itch: and leprosy covered all their flesh, and their hair dropped from their heads, and their fair scalps were made bare.'

Fragment #19A—1719 Oxyrhynchus Papyri 1358 fr. 1 (3rd cent. A.D.): 1720 (ll. 1-32) '....So she (Europa) crossed the briny water from afar to Crete, beguiled by the wiles of Zeus. Secretly did the Father snatch her away and gave her a gift, the golden necklace, the toy which Hephaestus the famed craftsman once made by his cunning skill and brought and gave it to his father for a possession. And Zeus received the gift, and gave it in turn to the daughter of proud Phoenix. But when the Father of men and of gods had mated so far off with trim-ankled Europa, then he departed back again from the rich-haired girl. So she bare sons to the almighty Son of Cronos, glorious leaders of wealthy men—Minos the ruler, and just Rhadamanthys and noble Sarpedon the blameless and strong. To these did wise Zeus give each a share of his honour. Verily Sarpedon reigned mightily over wide Lycia and ruled very many cities filled with people, wielding the sceptre of Zeus: and great honour followed him, which his father gave him, the great-hearted shepherd of the people. For wise Zeus ordained that he should live for three generations of mortal men and not waste away with old age. He sent him to Troy; and Sarpedon gathered a great host, men chosen out of Lycia to be allies to the Trojans. These men did Sarpedon lead, skilled in bitter war. And Zeus, whose wisdom is everlasting, sent him forth from heaven a star, showing tokens for the return of his dear son........for well he (Sarpedon) knew in his heart that the sign was indeed from Zeus. Very greatly did he excel in war together with man-slaying Hector and brake down the wall, bringing woes upon the Danaans. But so soon as Patroclus had inspired the Argives with hard courage....'

Fragment #19—Scholiast on Homer, Il. xii. 292: Zeus saw Europa the daughter of Phoenix gathering flowers in a meadow with some nymphs and fell in love with her. So he came down and changed himself into a bull and breathed from his mouth a crocus 1721. In this way he deceived Europa, carried her off and crossed the sea to Crete where he had intercourse with her. Then in this condition he made her live with Asterion the king of the Cretans. There she conceived and bore three sons, Minos, Sarpedon and Rhadamanthys. The tale is in Hesiod and Bacchylides.

Fragment #20—Scholiast on Apollonius Rhodius, Arg. ii. 178: But according to Hesiod (Phineus) was the son of Phoenix, Agenor's son and Cassiopea.

Fragment #21—Apollodorus 1722, iii. 14.4.1: But Hesiod says that he (Adonis) was the son of Phoenix and Alphesiboea.

Fragment #22—Porphyrius, Quaest. Hom. ad Iliad. pert. p. 189: As it is said in Hesiod in the "Catalogue of Women" concerning Demodoce the daughter of Agenor: 'Demodoce whom very many of men on earth, mighty princes, wooed, promising splendid gifts, because of her exceeding beauty.'

Fragment #23—Apollodorus, iii. 5.6.2: Hesiod says that (the children of Amphion and Niobe) were ten sons and ten daughters.


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