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Hesiod, The Homeric Hymns, and Homerica

Page: 56

(ll. 8-20) '"Hear me all, both young and old, while I speak as my spirit within my breast bids me. Hippomenes seeks my coy-eyed daughter to wife; but let him now hear my wholesome speech. He shall not win her without contest; yet, if he be victorious and escape death, and if the deathless gods who dwell on Olympus grant him to win renown, verily he shall return to his dear native land, and I will give him my dear child and strong, swift-footed horses besides which he shall lead home to be cherished possessions; and may he rejoice in heart possessing these, and ever remember with gladness the painful contest. May the father of men and of gods (grant that splendid children may be born to him)' 1712

((LACUNA))

(ll. 21-27) 'on the right.... and he, rushing upon her,.... drawing back slightly towards the left. And on them was laid an unenviable struggle: for she, even fair, swift-footed Atalanta, ran scorning the gifts of golden Aphrodite; but with him the race was for his life, either to find his doom, or to escape it. Therefore with thoughts of guile he said to her:

(ll. 28-29) '"O daughter of Schoeneus, pitiless in heart, receive these glorious gifts of the goddess, golden Aphrodite...'

((LACUNA))

(ll. 30-36) 'But he, following lightly on his feet, cast the first apple 1713: and, swiftly as a Harpy, she turned back and snatched it. Then he cast the second to the ground with his hand. And now fair, swift-footed Atalanta had two apples and was near the goal; but Hippomenes cast the third apple to the ground, and therewith escaped death and black fate. And he stood panting and...'


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