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Bible Myths and their Parallels in other Religions Being a Comparison of the Old and New Testament Myths and Miracles with those of the Heathen Nations of Antiquity Considering also their Origin and Meaning

Page: 334

the story of, borrowed from Chaldean sources, 109;
  • fought with his angels against the dragon, 386.
  • Miletus, the crucified god of, 191.
  • Millennium, doctrine of the, 239.
  • Minos, the Lawgiver of the Cretans, 60;
  • receives the Laws from Zeus, 60.
  • Minutius Felix, on the crucified man, 197.
  • Miracles, the, of Jesus, 252;
  • of Crishna, 253;
  • of Buddha, 254, 255;
  • of Zoroaster, 256;
  • Bochia, 256;
  • Horus, 256;
  • Osiris, 256;
  • Serapis, 257;
  • Marduk, 257;
  • Bacchus, 257;
  • Æsculapius, 257;
  • Apollonius, 261;
  • Simon Magus, 264;
  • Menander, 266;
  • Vespasian, 268.
  • Miraculous Conception, the, of, Jesus, 111;
  • parallels to, 112-131.
  • Mithras, a "Mediator between God and Man," 194;
  • called the "Saviour," and the "Logos," 194;
  • is put to death, and rises again to life, 223;
  • a personification of the Sun, 507.
  • Mohammed (see Mahomet).
  • Molech, the god, worshiped by the Heathen nations, and the children of Israel, 108.
  • Monad, a, in the Egyptian Trinity, 373.
  • Monasteries, among Heathen nations, 400.
  • Monasticism, a vast and powerful institution in Buddhist countries, 403.
  • Monks, were common among Heathen nations before the Christian era, 400-404.
  • Montanus, believed himself an Angel-Messiah, 428.
  • Months, the twelve, compared with the Apostles, 500.
  • Moon, the, was personified among ancient nations, and called the "Queen of Heaven," 478.
  • Moral Sentiments, the, of the New Testament, compared with those from Heathen Bibles, 415.
  • Mosaic history, the so-called, a myth, 17.
  • Moses, divides the Red Sea, 50;
  • is thrown into the Nile, 89.
  • Mother, the, of God, worshiped among the ancients, 326.
  • Mother Night, the 24th of December called, 365.
  • Mother of the Gods, the, Aditi called, 475.
  • Mount Meru, the Hindoo paradise on, 13.
  • Mummy, a cross on the breast of an Egyptian, in the British Museum, 341.
  • Muscovites, the, worshiped a virgin and child, 333;
  • worshiped a Trinity, 378.
  • [Pg 582]Mylitta, the goddess, worshiped by the Hebrews, 108.
  • Myrrha, the mother of Bacchus, 332;
  • same as Mary, 332.
  • Myth, a, the theology of Christendom built upon, 17.
  • Mythology, all religions founded upon, 563.
  • Mythos, the universal, 505.
  • N.
  • Nganu, the Africans of Lake, had a similar story to the "Confusion of Tongues," 36.
  • Nakshatias, the, of the Indian Zodiac, are regarded as deities, 142.
  • Nanda, the foster-father of Crishna, 158.
  • Nared, a great prophet and astrologer, 143;
  • pointed out Crishna's stars, 143.
  • Nazarenes, the, saw in Jesus nothing more than a mere man, 135.
  • Nebuchadnezzar, repaired the tower of Babel, 85.
  • Necromancer, Jesus represented as a, 273.
  • Nehush-tan, the Sun worshiped under the name of, 491.
  • Neith, the mother of Osiris, 364;
  • called the "Holy Virgin," 364;
  • the "Mother of the Gods," and "Mother of the Sun," 476;
  • a personification of the dawn, 476.
  • Nepaul, the crucified God found in, 187.
  • Nicaragua, the inhabitants of, called their principal God Thomathoyo, 130.
  • Nice, the Council of, 381;
  • anathematized those who say that there was a time when the Son of God was not, 381.
  • Nile, the temples on the north bank of the river dedicated to the kings of Egypt, 122;
  • a sacred river, 318.
  • Nimrod, built the tower of Babel, 34.
  • Ninevah, Jonah goes to, 81;
  • cylinders discovered on the site of, contained the legend of the flood, 101.
  • Niparaga, the Supreme Creator of the Endes of California, 131.
  • Nisan, the angel, borrowed from the Chaldeans, 109.
  • Noah, the ark of, 119.
  • Noel, Christmas in French called, 365.
  • Nut, a personification of Heaven, 477.
  • Nutar Nutra, the, of the Egyptians, corresponds to the Hebrew El-Shaddai, 49.
  • O.
  • Oannes, Chaldean fish-god, 82;
  • the same as Jonah, 83.
  • Odin, the Supreme God of the Scandinavians, 479;
  • a personification of the Heavens, 479.
  • Œdipus, the history of, resembles that of Samson and Hercules, 72;
  • tears out his eyes, 72;
  • is a dangerous child, 170;
  • cheered in his last hours by Antigone, 493;
  • a personification of the Sun, 493.
  • Offerings (Votive) made to the Heathen deities, 259.
  • Olympus, the, of the Pagans, restored, 398.
  • O. M., or A. U. M., a sacred name among the Hindoos, 372;
  • an emblem of the Trinity, 352.
  • Omphale, the amours of Hercules with, 71.
  • One, the myths of the crucified gods melt into, 492.
  • One God, worshiped by the ancestors of our race, 384.
  • Only Begotten Son, common before the Christian era, 193.
  • Oort, Prof., on the sacred laws of ancient nations, 61.
  • Ophites, the, worshiped serpents as emblems of Christ, 355.
  • Orders, religious among all nations of antiquity, 400-404.
  • Origen, declared the story of creation and fall of man to be allegorical, 100.
  • Original Sin, the doctrine of, of great antiquity, 184;
  • the Indians no strangers to, 189.
  • Ormuzd, the Supreme God of the Persians, 7;
  • divided the work of creation into six parts, 7.
  • Orontes, the river, divided by Bacchus, 81.
  • Osiris, confined in a chest and thrown into the Nile, 90;
  • [Pg 583]a Virgin-born God, 190;
  • suffers death, 190;
  • rose from the dead, 222;
  • the judge of the dead, 245;
  • performed miracles, 256;
  • the worship of, of great antiquity, 452;
  • a personification of the Sun, 484.
  • Oude, the crucified God Bal-li worshiped at, 188.
  • Ovid, describes the doctrine of Metempsychosis, 43.
  • P.
  • Pagan Religion, the, adopted by the Christians, 384;
  • was typical of Christianity, 501.
  • Pan, had a flute of seven pipes, 81.
  • Pandora, the first woman, in Grecian mythology, 10.
  • Pantheon, the, a niche always ready in, of the ancients, for a new divinity, 123.
  • Paraclete, Simon Magus claimed to be the, 164.
  • Paradise, all nations believed in a, 389, 390.
  • Parsees, the, direct descendants of the Persians, 25;
  • say that man was once destroyed by a deluge, 25.
  • Parnassus, Mount, the ark of Deucalion rested on, 26.
  • Parthenon, the, at Athens, sacred to Minerva, 333.
  • Passover, the, celebrated by the Jews on the same day that the Heathens celebrated the resurrections of their Gods, 226;
  • the Jews used eggs in the feast of, 228.
  • Patriarchs, the, all stories of, unhistorical, 54.
  • Paul, St., a minister of the Gospel which had been preached to every creature under heaven, 514.
  • Pentateuch, the, never ascribed to Moses in the inscriptions of Hebrew manuscripts, 92;
  • ascribed to Moses after the Babylonian captivity, 92;
  • origin of, 93, 96.
  • Perictione, a Virgin mother, 127.
  • Perseus, shut up in a chest, and cast into the sea, 89;
  • the son of Jupiter by the Virgin Danae, 124;
  • a temple erected to him in Athens, 124;
  • a dangerous child, 169.
  • Persia, pre-Christian crosses found in, 343, 344.
  • Persians, the, denominate the first man Adama, 7;
  • had a legend of creation corresponding with the Hebrew, 8;
  • had a legend of the war in heaven, 387.
  • Peru, crosses found in, 349;
  • worship of a Trinity found in, 378.
  • Peruvians, the, adored the cross, 349;
  • worshiped a Trinity, 378.
  • Peter, St., has the keys of Janus, 399.
  • Phallic tree, the, is introduced into the narrative in Genesis, 47.
  • Phallic worship, the story of Jacob setting up a pillar alludes to, 46;
  • practiced by the nations of antiquity, 46, 47.
  • Phallic Emblems, in Christian churches, 358.
  • Phallus, the, a "Hermes," set up on the road-side, was the symbol of, 46.
  • Pamphylian Sea, the, divided by Alexander, 55.
  • Pharaoh, his dreams, 88;
  • parallel to, 89.
  • Phenician deity, the principal, was El, 484.
  • Philo, considered the fictions of Genesis allegories, 100;
  • says nothing about Jesus, or the Christians, 564.
  • Philosophers, the, of ancient Greece, called Christians, 409.
  • Philosophy, the Christian religion called a, 567.
  • Phœdrus, the river, dried up by Isis, 55.
  • Phœnicians, the, offered the fairest of their children to the gods, 41.
  • Phœnix, the, lived 600 years, 426.
  • Phrygians, the, worshiped the god Atys, 190.
  • Pilate, pillaged the temple treasury, 521;
  • crucified Jesus, 526.
  • Pillars of Hercules, the, 79.
  • Pious Frauds, 231.
  • Pisces, the sign of, applied to Christ Jesus, 355-504.
  • Plato, believed to have been the son of a pure virgin, 127.
  • Platonists, the, believed in a Trinity, 375.
  • [Pg 584]Pole, or Pillar, a, worshiped by the ancients, 46, 47.
  • Polynesian Mythology, in, a fish is emblematic of the earth, 80.
  • Pontius Pilate (see Pilate).
  • Poo-ta-la, the name of a Buddhist monastery found in China, 401.
  • Pope, the, thrusts out his foot to be kissed as the Roman Emperors were in the habit of doing, 400.
  • Portuguese, the, call the mountain in Ceylon, Pico d' Adama, 13.
  • Porus, the troops of, carried on their standards the figure of a man, 198.
  • Prayers, for the dead, made by Buddhist priests, 401.
  • Priests, the Buddhist, have fasting, prayers for the dead, holy water, rosaries of beads, the worship of relics, and a monastic habit resembling the Franciscans, 401.
  • Priestesses, among the ancients, similar to the modern nuns, 403, 404.
  • Primeval male, the, offered himself a sacrifice for the gods, 181.
  • Prithivi, the Earth worshiped under the name of, by the Hindoos, 477.
  • Prometheus, a deity who united the divine and human nature in one person, 124;
  • a crucified Saviour,

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