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Bible Myths and their Parallels in other Religions Being a Comparison of the Old and New Testament Myths and Miracles with those of the Heathen Nations of Antiquity Considering also their Origin and Meaning

Page: 196

[326:1] See Bonwick's Egyptian Belief, p. 115, and Monumental Christianity, pp. 206 and 226.

[326:2] Inman: Ancient Faiths, vol. i. p. 159.

[326:3] See Williams' Hinduism.

[326:4] See Higgins: Anacalypsis, vol. i. p. 540.

[326:5] See Taylor's Diegesis, p. 185.

[326:6] St. Jerome says: "It is handed down as a tradition among the Gymnosophists of India, that Buddha, the founder of their system was brought forth by a virgin from her side." (Contra Jovian, bk. i. Quoted in Rhys Davids' Buddhism, p. 183.)

[327:1] Plate 59.

[327:2] Monumental Christianity, p. 218.

Of the Virgin Mary we read: "Her face was shining as snow, and its brightness could hardly be borne. Her conversation was with the angels, &c." (Nativity of Mary, Apoc.)

[327:3] See Ancient Faiths, i. 401.

[327:4] Davis' China, vol. ii. p. 95.

[327:5] The Heathen Relig., p. 60.

[327:6] Barrows: Travels in China, p. 467.

[327:7] Gutzlaff's Voyages, p. 154.

[328:1] Bonwick's Egyptian Belief, p. 141.

[328:2] See The Lily of Israel, p. 14.

[328:3] Kenrick's Egypt, vol. i. p. 425.

[328:4] See Draper's Science and Religion, pp. 47, 48, and Higgins' Anacalypsis, vol. i. p. 804.

[328:5] Pagan and Christian Symbolism, p. 50.

[328:6] See Monumental Christianity, p. 307, and Dr. Inman's Ancient Faiths.

[328:7] See Cox's Aryan Mytho., vol. ii. p. 119, note.

[328:8] See Pagan and Christian Symbolism, pp. 13, 14.

[329:1] Pagan and Christian Symbolism, pp. 4, 5.

[329:2] See Knight: Ancient Art and Mythology, pp. 45, 104, 105.

"We see, in pictures, that the Virgin and Child are associated in modern times with the split apricot, the pomegranate, rimmon, and the Vine, just as was the ancient Venus." (Dr. Inman: Ancient Faiths, vol. i. p. 528.)

[329:3] Serpent Symbol, p. 39.

[329:4] Taylor's Diegesis, p. 185.

[330:1] Bonwick's Egyptian Belief, p. 143.

[330:2] Ibid. p. 115.

[330:3] Quoted in Ibid. p. 115.

[330:4] Ibid., and Kenrick's Egypt.

[330:5] Inman's Ancient Faiths, vol. i. p. 59.

[330:6] See Monumental Christianity, p. 211, and Ancient Faiths, vol. ii. p. 350.

[330:7] Ancient Faiths, vol. i. p. 213.

[332:1] Jeremiah, xliv. 16-22.

[332:2] See Colenso's Lectures, p. 297, and Bonwick's Egyptian Belief, p. 148.

[332:3] See the Pentateuch Examined, vol. vi. p. 115, App., and Bonwick's Egyptian Belief, p. 148.

[332:4] See King's Gnostics, p. 91, and Monumental Christianity, p. 224.

[332:5] See Dupuis: Origin of Relig. Belief, p. 237.

[332:6] It would seem more than chance that so many of the virgin mothers and goddesses of antiquity should have the same name. The mother of Bacchus was Myrrha: the mother of Mercury or Hermes was Myrrha or Maia (See Fergusson's Tree and Serpent Worship, p. 186, and Inman's Ancient Faiths, vol. ii. p. 233); the mother of the Siamese Saviour—Sommona Cadom—was called Maya Maria, i. e., "the Great Mary;" the mother of Adonis was Myrrha (See Anacalypsis, vol. i. p. 314, and Inman's Ancient Faiths, vol. ii. p. 253); the mother of Buddha was Maya; now, all these names, whether Myrrha, Maia or Maria, are the same as Mary, the name of the mother of the Christian Saviour. (See Inman's Ancient Faiths, vol. ii. pp. 353 and 780. Also, Dunlap's Mysteries of Adoni, p. 124.) The month of May was sacred to these goddesses, so likewise is it sacred to the Virgin Mary at the present day. She was also called Myrrha and Maria, as well as Mary. (See Anacalypsis, vol. i. p. 304, and Son of the Man, p. 26.)

[332:7] Higgins: Anacalypsis, vol. i. pp. 303, 304.

[332:8] Prof. Wilder, in "Evolution," June, '77. Isis Unveiled, vol. ii.

[332:9] Stuckley: Pal. Sac. No. 1, p. 34, in Anacalypsis, i. p. 304.

[333:1] Higgins: Anacalypsis, vol. i. p. 305.

[333:2] See Bell's Pantheon, and Knight: Ancient Art and Mytho., p. 175.

[333:3] See Roman Antiquities, p. 73. Anacalypsis, vol. ii. p. 82, and Bell's Pantheon, vol. ii. p. 160.

[333:4] See Monumental Christianity, p. 308—Fig. 144.

[333:5] See Knight: Anct. Art and Mytho., pp. 175, 176.

[333:6] See Montfaucon, vol. i. plate xcii.

[333:7] Knight's Anct. Art and Mytho., p. 147.

[334:1] Anacalypsis, vol. ii. pp. 109, 110.

[334:2] See Knight's Anct. Art and Mytho., p. 21.

[334:3] See Prog. Relig. Ideas, vol. i. p. 374, and Mallet: Northern Antiquities.

[334:4] Knight: Anct. Art and Mytho., p. 147.

[334:5] See Mallet's Northern Antiquities.

[334:6] See Higgins: Anacalypsis, vol. ii. pp. 108, 109, 259. Dupuis: Orig. Relig. Belief, p. 257. Celtic Druids, p. 163, and Taylor's Diegesis, p. 184.

[334:7] See Celtic Druids, p. 163, and Dupuis, p. 237.

[334:8] Ancient Faiths, vol. i. p. 100.

[334:9] See Anacalypsis, vol. ii. p. 33, and Mexican Antiquities, vol. vi. p. 176.

[335:1] Mexican Antiquities, vol. vi. p. 176.

[335:2] Ibid.

[335:3] Ibid.

[335:4] Higgins: Anacalypsis, vol. i. p. 304.

[335:5] Ibid. vol. ii. p. 82.

[335:6] Quoted in Ibid.

[335:7] See Middleton's Letters from Rome, p. 236.

[335:8] Higgins: Anacalypsis, vol. i. p. 138.

[336:1] Higgins: Anacalypsis, vol. i. p. 138.

[336:2] Bambino—a term in art, descriptive of the swaddled figure of the infant Saviour.

[336:3] Ancient Faiths, vol. i. p. 401.

[336:4] Higgins: Anacalypsis, vol. i. p. 138.

[336:5] Letters from Rome, p. 84.

[337:1] Monumental Christianity, p. 208.

[337:2] See Ibid. p. 229, and Moore's Hindu Pantheon, Inman's Christian and Pagan Symbolism, Higgins' Anacalypsis, vol. ii., where the figures of Crishna and Devaki may be seen, crowned, laden with jewels, and a ray of glory surrounding their heads.

[337:3] Monumental Christianity, p. 227.

[337:4] Ibid.

[337:5] Ancient Faiths, vol. ii. p. 767.

[337:6] In King's Gnostics and their Remains, p. 109, the author gives a description of a procession, given during the second century by Apuleius, in honor of Isis, the "Immaculate Lady."

[337:7] King's Gnostics, p. 71.

[337:8] "Serapis does not appear to be one of the native gods, or monsters, who sprung from the fruitful soil of Egypt. The first of the Ptolemies had been commanded, by a dream, to import the mysterious stranger from the coast of Pontus, where he had been long adored by the inhabitants of Sinope; but his attributes and his reign were so imperfectly understood, that it became a subject of dispute, whether he represented the bright orb of day, or the gloomy monarch of the subterraneous regions." (Gibbon's Rome, vol. iii. p. 143.)

[337:9] Ibid.

[337:10] King's Gnostics, p. 71, note.

[338:1] Bonwick's Egyptian Belief, p. 141. "Black is the color of the Egyptian Isis." (The Rosecrucians, p. 154.)

[338:2] Ancient Faiths, vol. i. p. 159. In Montfaucon, vol. i. plate xcv., may be seen a representation of a Black Venus.

[338:3] Ancient Faiths, vol. ii. p. 264.

[338:4] Quoted in Bonwick's Egyptian Belief, p. 142.

[338:5] Notes 3 and 4 to Tacitus' Manners of the Germans.


[Pg 339]

CHAPTER XXXIII.

CHRISTIAN SYMBOLS.

A thorough investigation of this subject would require a volume, therefore, as we can devote but a chapter to it, it must necessarily be treated somewhat slightingly.

The first of the Christian Symbols which we shall notice is the CROSS.

Overwhelming historical facts show that the cross was used, as a religious emblem, many centuries before the Christian era, by every nation in the world. Bishop Colenso, speaking on this subject, says:—

"From the dawn of organized Paganism in the Eastern world, to the final establishment of Christianity in the West, the cross was undoubtedly one of the commonest and most sacred of symbolical monuments. Apart from any distinctions of social or intellectual superiority, of caste, color, nationality, or location in either hemisphere, it appears to have been the aboriginal possession of every people in antiquity.


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