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An Introduction to Mythology

Page: 148

Chapter VI, 158 et seq.
Manannan mac Lir, lord of Irish Hades, 263, 295
Manawyddan, British deity, 263, 295
Mandan Sioux Indians, creation myth of, 182
Mani, Polynesian god, myth of, 142
Mannhardt, his defection from the philological school, 53; his
method, 54; Frazer's method founded on that of, 75; on vegetation
spirits, 79
Maoris, their myth of original man, 148
Marett, Dr R. R., on myth as non-explanatory, 15 n.; on
pre-animistic beliefs, 23 et seq.; his Threshold of
Religion, 88; on the 'religious' in animism and mythology, 88;
on etiological myths, 89
Marine deities, 125
Maya, belief in destruction by fire among, 139; culture myth of, 150;
fire myth of, 152
Mars, as agricultural god, 124
May-time ceremonies in Scotland, 248 et seq.
Medico-religious practice, 300
Medieval mythology, 43
Melanesians, their myth of origin of man, 148; culture myth of, 150
Mercury, Roman deity, 32, 237, 294
Merodach, Babylonian god, 167, 283, 288-289; as sun-god, 120;
defeats Tiawath, 166; described, 286-287
Metaphysics, savage, 21
Meteorological school of mythology, 51
Meulen, god of Araucanian Indians of Chile, 310, 312
Mexicans, myths of birth of gods of, 144; creation myth of, 147;
myth of the origin of heroes of, 149; culture myth of, 150; flood
myth of, 153; place of punishment of, 154; star myth of, 156.
See also Aztecs
Mexican myth, flint-gods in, 26 et seq.; of Uitzilopochtli, 32;
creation myths, 171-172; Heaven, 210-211; Hades, 211; sources
of, 263-270; mythology described, 296 et seq.
Mexico, Payne on mythology of, 84; Mother-goddess in, 98;
blood-sacrifice in, 113
Michabo, Algonquin Indian creative god, 139, 177
Mictecaciuatl, wife of Mictlantecutli, 211
Mictlantecutli, lord of the Mexican Hades, 196, 211, 218 Milky Way,
in South American myth, 141; as Slavonic path to Heaven, 209; as
American Indian route to Paradise, 211-212
Milton, mythology of, 44
Minerva, 278; Ben Jonson mentions, 280; described, 284
Minos, 206
Mithra, Persian deity, 289
Mitra, Hindu deity, 289
Mixcoatl, Mexican god, 124
Mjolnir, hammer of Thor, 294
Modern Mythology, Lang's, 66, 71
Mohammed confused with gods, 43
Mohammedans, soul myth of, 152
Monan, deity of Tupi-Guarani Indians, attempts destruction of
world, 139, 183
Monotheism, causes of, 30
Moon-gods, 126-127; their qualities, 127; connexion with water, 127;
goddess, her connexion with fertility, 127; with love, 127;
myths classified, 155-156
Morrigan, Irish war-goddess, 296
Mother-goddess in Mexico, 98
Mound-building in America, 305-306
Moxos Indians, star myth of, 140
Müller, K. O., his view of mythic science, 46
Müller, Professor Max, definition of religion, 14; on character of
early thought, 21 et seq.; his interpretation of myth, 47
et seq.; 50-51; applied methods of comparative philology
to myth, 48; described myth as 'a disease of language,' 48; his
critics, 49-50; opposed by anthropological school, 52; his theory
of effect of gender-terminations upon beliefs regarding natural
phenomena, 52; Mannhardt on his theory, 53
Mummification, theory of soul developed from, 79
Mummu, Babylonian monster, 34-35, 166
Mundruku Indians, creation myth of, 183
Murri tribe, fire-stealing myth of, 149
Muskhogean Indians, traditions of, 305
Muyscas Indians, flood myth of, 153; moon myth of, 156
Mysteries, Greek, 19
Myth, definitions of, 11, 12 et seq., 87; regarded by some as
religious in character, 13, 20, 63, 88; its inter-relation with
comparative religion, 14 et seq.; elements of, 15 n.;
its relations with history, 15 n., 34, 42, 58, 90-91, 92;
savage and irrational element in, 15, 16, 18 et seq.,
45, 65, 67, 69-90; editing of, 16, 18, 33-35; and early science, 20;
invention of, 21; development of, 30-31, 58; and spirit of sanctity,
32-33; fusion in, 33; purgation of, 33; explanation of, lost, 34;
antiquity of, 33-34; causes of its change, 33-34; classification
of, 35 et seq.; distribution of, 35-36; theory of origin of,
in one centre, 36; fixity of, 38, 55-56; authenticity of, 39;
Christian fathers on, 43; 'psychic' explanation of, 43; scientific
treatment of, 46; its comprehension through language, 48, and
see Müller; as natural phenomena, 43; 'pragmatical' explanation
of, 43; Müller's interpretation of, 50; personalism in, 56; among
races of low culture, 56; and natural phenomena, 57; names in, 57-58;
its regularity of development, 58; regarded by some as non-religious
in character, 61, 68, 87, 92; and ritual, 61, 64, 89, 238; as
primitive philosophy, 62; interpreted by allegory, renders ancient
forms significant, 62; non-ethical nature of, 64; difference between,
and religion, 68; early, not essentially absurd or blasphemous, 69;
difference between dogma and, one of degree only, 69; arguments
against Lang's conception of, 69; Lang's three stages of, 70;
interpretations of, in accordance with contemporary ideas, 70;
complexity of, 70; comparison of savage with 'civilized,' 71;
stratification theory of, 81-82; survival of, due to grouping, 86;
secondary, 90, 238; in early, animals take place of gods, 109; solar,
its groundwork, 120; various classes of, 138; and folklore, connexion
between, 234; written sources of, 245 et seq.; in English

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